Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

Indexed in: ESCI, Scopus, PubMed,
PubMed Central, CAS, DOAJ, KCI
FREE article processing charge
OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Previous issues
22 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Funded articles
Volume 35(1); June 2018
Prev issue Next issue
Review Articles
Beta-amyloid imaging in dementia
Kyung Ah Chun
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):1-6.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.1
  • 7,585 View
  • 116 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with extracellular plaques, composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ), in the brain. Although the precise mechanism underlying the neurotoxicity of Aβ has not been established, Aβ accumulation is the primary event in a cascade of events that lead to neurofibrillary degeneration and dementia. In particular, the Aβ burden, as assessed by neuroimaging, has proved to be an excellent predictive biomarker. Positron emission tomography, using ligands such as 11C-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B or 18F-labeled tracers, such as 18F-florbetaben, 18F-florbetapir, and 18F-flutemetamol, which bind to Aβ deposits in the brain, has been a valuable technique for visualizing and quantifying the deposition of Aβ throughout the brain in living subjects. Aβ imaging has very high sensitivity for detecting AD pathology. In addition, it can predict the progression from mild cognitive impairment to AD, and contribute to the development of disease-specific therapies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sex modifies effects of imaging and CSF biomarkers on cognitive and functional outcomes: a study of Alzheimer's disease
    Brian N. Lee, Junwen Wang, Molly A. Hall, Dokyoon Kim, Shana D. Stites, Li Shen
    Neurobiology of Aging.2024; 133: 67.     CrossRef
  • Current status of PET tracers for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease
    Yuying Li, Tianqing Liu, Qi Zeng, Mengchao Cui
    TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry.2024; 172: 117546.     CrossRef
  • Fluorine-18-Labeled Diaryl-azines as Improved β-Amyloid Imaging Tracers: From Bench to First-in-Human Studies
    Yuying Li, Kaixiang Zhou, Xiaojun Zhang, Hailong Zhao, Xiaoming Wang, Ruilin Dong, Yan Wang, Baian Chen, Xiao-xin Yan, Jiapei Dai, Yanying Sui, Jinming Zhang, Mengchao Cui
    Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.2023; 66(7): 4603.     CrossRef
  • Traumatic axonal injury: neuropathological features, postmortem diagnostic methods, and strategies
    Qianling Chen, Xuebing Chen, Luyao Xu, Rui Zhang, Zhigang Li, Xia Yue, Dongfang Qiao
    Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology.2022; 18(4): 530.     CrossRef
  • Design, synthesis and evaluation of fused hybrids with acetylcholinesterase inhibiting and Nrf2 activating functions for Alzheimer's disease
    Yuanyuan Wang, Baichen Xiong, Hongzhi Lin, Qi Li, Hongyu Yang, Yuting Qiao, Qihang Li, Ziwei Xu, Weiping Lyu, Wei Qu, Wenyuan Liu, Yao Chen, Feng Feng, Haopeng Sun
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.2022; 244: 114806.     CrossRef
  • Tubulin modifying enzymes as target for the treatment of tau-related diseases
    Krzysztof Rogowski, Khaled Hached, Carole Crozet, Siem van der Laan
    Pharmacology & Therapeutics.2021; 218: 107681.     CrossRef
  • Imaging Techniques in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review of Applications in Early Diagnosis and Longitudinal Monitoring
    Wieke M. van Oostveen, Elizabeth C. M. de Lange
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(4): 2110.     CrossRef
  • Imaging Techniques as an Aid in the Early Detection of Cardiac Amyloidosis
    M.F. Santarelli, M. Scipioni, D. Genovesi, A. Giorgetti, P. Marzullo, L. Landini
    Current Pharmaceutical Design.2021; 27(16): 1878.     CrossRef
  • Protective roles of isoastilbin against Alzheimer's disease via Nrf2‑mediated antioxidation and anti‑apoptosis
    Hong Yu, Bo Yuan, Qiubo Chu, Chunyue Wang, Hui Bi
    International Journal of Molecular Medicine.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comprehensive understanding of vascular anatomy for endovascular treatment of intractable oronasal bleeding
Sungjun Moon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):7-16.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.7
  • 9,161 View
  • 162 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Oronasal bleeding that continues despite oronasal packs or recurs after removal of the oronasal packs is referred to as intractable oronasal bleeding, which is refractory to conventional treatments. Severe craniofacial injury or tumor in the nasal or paranasal cavity may cause intractable oronasal bleeding. These intractable cases are subsequently treated with surgical ligation or endovascular embolization of the bleeding arteries. While endovascular embolization has several merits compared to surgical ligation, the procedure needs attention because severe complications such as visual disturbance or cerebral infarction can occur. Therefore, comprehensive understanding of the head and neck vascular anatomy is essential for a more effective and safer endovascular treatment of intractable oronasal bleeding.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Endovascular intervention for the treatment of epistaxis: cone beam CT review of anatomy, collateral, and treatment implications/efficacy
    Madeline Hoover, Robert Berwanger, John A Scott, Andrew DeNardo, Krishna Amuluru, Troy Payner, Charles Kulwin, Eytan Raz, Daniel Gibson, Daniel H Sahlein
    Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.2024; 16(2): 192.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Calcium Alginate Dressing in Combination with Nasal Endoscopic Bipolar Electrocoagulation and Low-Temperature Plasma Knife Treatment on Bleeding Volume, Nasal Ventilation, Stress Response, and Recurrence Rate in Patients with Refractory E
    Yi Su, Xinye Guo, Yan Nie
    Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology.2023; 19(12): 2196.     CrossRef
  • Woodruff’s plexus—arterial or venous?
    Cezar Octavian Morosanu, Craig Humphreys, Stephanie Egerton, Claire M. Tierney
    Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy.2022; 44(1): 169.     CrossRef
Recent updates in transcatheter aortic valve implantation
Jeonghwan Cho, Ung Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):17-26.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.17
  • 5,675 View
  • 64 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved from a challenging intervention to a standardized, simple, and streamlined procedure with over 350,000 procedures performed in over 70 countries. It is now a novel alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with intermediate surgical risk and its indications have been expanded to cohorts with bicuspid aortic valves, low surgical risk, and younger age and fewer comorbidities. Attention should be paid to further reducing remaining complications, such as paravalvular aortic regurgitation, conduction abnormalities, cardiac tamponade, and stroke. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the rapidly changing field of TAVI treatment and to explore past achievements, current issues, and future perspectives of this treatment modality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Might simplification of transcatheter aortic valve implantation reduce the burden on hospital resources?
    Lenka Kratochvílová, Petr Mašek, Marek Neuberg, Markéta Nováčková, Petr Toušek, Jakub Sulženko, Tomáš Buděšínský, , and Viktor Kočka
    European Heart Journal Supplements.2022; 24(Supplement): B28.     CrossRef
Diabetes and depression
Eon-Ju Jeon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):27-35.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.27
  • 7,993 View
  • 145 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Diabetes and depression are serious chronic conditions. As a result of their increasing prevalence, diabetes and depression, together with population growth and aging, are public health issues. The rate of depression in adults with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes is high relative to the general population. The coexistence of diabetes and depression has attracted much interest. Although it is unclear whether diabetes and depression are causally linked, most studies have shown that the association between diabetes and depression might be bidirectional. Currently, emotional well-being is becoming an increasingly important aspect of diabetes care and self-management. Psychiatric disorders and diabetic distress among people with diabetes may increase the risk of diabetes complication and mortality. Thus, assessment and appropriate management of depression in people with diabetes should be considered to achieve psychological well-being and optimize medical outcomes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Investigating the association between diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis approach
    Elaheh Sanjari, Hadi Raeisi Shahraki, Lusine G. Khachatryan, Abdollah Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Rami M. Elshazli
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(4): e0299442.     CrossRef
  • Low Social Support and Risk for Depression in People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Akhmad Azmiardi, Bhisma Murti, Ratih Puspita Febrinasari, Didik Gunawan Tamtomo
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2022; 55(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Biopsychosocial and Nutritional Factors of Depression among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Systematic Review
    Norizzati Amsah, Zaleha Md Isa, Norfazilah Ahmad
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(8): 4888.     CrossRef
  • Depressive Disorder and Diabetes
    Eonju Jeon
    The Journal of Korean Diabetes.2022; 23(3): 178.     CrossRef
  • The differentiation of health behaviors by depression in U.S. diabetic patients
    Ying Liu, Candice Collins
    MOJ Public Health.2022; 11(2): 122.     CrossRef
  • Bioinformatics and Network Pharmacology-Based Approaches to Explore the Potential Mechanism of the Antidepressant Effect of Cyperi Rhizoma through Soothing the Liver
    Yuhe Lei, Mingquan Du, Ge Zhang, Lei Chen, Yanli Fu, Yinqin Zhong, Enxin Zhang, Junqing Huang
    Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Habenula lesions improve glucose metabolism in rats with type 2 diabetes by increasing insulin sensitivity and inhibiting gluconeogenesis
    Peng Qu, Yachun Wang, Lei Liu, Mengmeng Qi, Yimeng Sun, Siyang Zheng, Zichen Xu, Changhong Liu, Xiaoyan Bai, Qinggao Zhang, Limin Yang
    BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.2020; 8(1): e001250.     CrossRef
IRB review points for studies utilizing paraffin blocks archived in the pathology laboratory
Yong-Jin Kim, Chang Rok Jeong, Jeong Sik Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):36-39.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.36
  • 5,565 View
  • 60 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
In the personalized medicine era, utilizing paraffin blocks in pathology archives for investigating human diseases has come into the limelight. This archived material with clinical data will reduce the research time and could prevent new patient recruitment to obtain tissue for research. However, the clause indicating the necessity of consent from human material providers in the Korean Bioethics and Safety Act has made the Institutional Review Board (IRB) deny permission to use paraffin blocks for research without consent, and alternatively to get the same before starting an experiment. Written consent may be waived off in studies using paraffin blocks with anonymous status or conditions not linked to personal information by applying the paragraph 3, article 16 of the current Bioethics and Safety Act. Also, the IRB should recommend researchers to preserve the blocks as medical records of patients in long-term archives.
Original Articles
Effect of preoperative pregabalin on postoperative pain after gastrectomy
Chan Yoon Park, Sol Hee Park, Dong Gun Lim, Eun Kyung Choi
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):40-44.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.40
  • 5,263 View
  • 81 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pregabalin has been studied as a single or multimodal analgesic drug for postoperative pain management in different types of surgeries. We evaluated the analgesic effect of 150 mg of pregabalin in resolving post-gastrectomy pain.
Methods
Forty-four patients were randomized into two groups: a pregabalin group that received oral pregabalin (150 mg) 2 h before anesthetic induction, and a control group that received placebo tablets at the same time. Data on postoperative pain intensity (visual analog scale [VAS], at 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, and 24 h), consumption of fentanyl in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and the proportion of patients requiring rescue analgesics at different time intervals (0-2 h, 2-4 h, and 4-24 h) were collected during the 24 h postoperative period.
Results
The VAS scores did not show significant differences at any time point and consumption of fentanyl in PCA and the proportion of patients requiring rescue analgesics did not differ between the two groups. The groups did not differ in the occurrence of dizziness, sedation, and dry mouth.
Conclusion
A preoperative 150 mg dose of pregabalin exerts no effect on acute pain after gastrectomy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Treatment of acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing open abdominal aortic repair (current state of the problem)
    Anzhelika V. Kozhanova, Georgy P. Plotnikov
    Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain Management.2022; 16(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of premedication with 75 mg and 150 mg pregabalin for postoperative analgesia in total hysterectomy patients - A randomised control trial
    Ajish Varghese Cheruvathur, Dilshad Thondi Parambil, Saurabh Vig, Salman Mohammed Kutty Chenath, Priyadharshini Nagaraj, Krupa Mulgaonkar, S Jeevithan
    Indian Journal of Clinical Anaesthesia.2022; 9(4): 467.     CrossRef
Ultrasound-guided superficial cervical plexus block under dexmedetomidine sedation versus general anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy: a retrospective pilot study
Wangseok Do, Ah-Reum Cho, Eun-Jung Kim, Hyae-Jin Kim, Eunsoo Kim, Heon-Jeong Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):45-53.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.45
  • 6,674 View
  • 86 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been performed under regional and general anesthesia (GA). The general anesthesia versus local anesthesia for carotid surgery study compared the two techniques and concluded that there was no difference in perioperative outcomes. However, since this trial, new sedative agents have been introduced and devices that improve the delivery of regional anesthesia (RA) have been developed. The primary purpose of this pilot study was to compare intraoperative hemodynamic stability and postoperative outcomes between GA and ultrasound-guided superficial cervical plexus block (UGSCPB) under dexmedetomidine sedation for CEA.
Methods
Medical records from 43 adult patients who underwent CEA were retrospectively reviewed, including 16 in the GA group and 27 in the RA group. GA was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane. The UGSCPB was performed with ropivacaine under dexmedetomidine sedation. We compared the intraoperative requirement for vasoactive drugs, postoperative complications, pain scores using the numerical rating scale, and the duration of hospital stay.
Results
There was no difference between groups in the use of intraoperative antihypertensive drugs. However, intraoperative inotropic and vasopressor agents were more frequently required in the GA group (p<0.0001). In the GA group, pain scores were significantly higher during the first 24 h after surgery (p<0.0001 between 0-6 h, p<0.004 between 6-12 h, and p<0.001 between 12-24 h). The duration of hospital stay was significantly more in the GA group (13.3±4.6 days in the GA group vs. 8.5±2.4 days in the RA group, p<0.001).
Conclusion
In this pilot study, intraoperative hemodynamic stability and postoperative outcomes were better in the RA compared to the GA group.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Outcomes of Dexmedetomidine with Local Regional Anesthesia in Carotid Endarterectomy
    Samik H. Patel, Vikram L. Sundararaghavan, Amber M. Pawlikowski, Jeremy Albright, Jason M. Adams, Michael J. Heidenreich, Robert J. Beaulieu, Abdulhameed Aziz
    Annals of Vascular Surgery.2023; 89: 174.     CrossRef
  • Anesthetic Management of a Patient Undergoing Cochlear Implantation With Superficial Cervical Plexus Block and Sedation: A Case Report
    Natsuki Takemura, Tetsuya Miyashita, Yasuko Baba
    A&A Practice.2022; 16(1): e01555.     CrossRef
  • Ultrasound-guided intermediate cervical plexus block for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy under general anesthesia: a case-control study
    Onat BERMEDE, Volkan BAYTAŞ
    Journal of Contemporary Medicine.2022; 12(2): 261.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between annular calcification of plaques in the carotid sinus and perioperative hemodynamic disorder in carotid angioplasty and stenting
    Qingjie Chi, Zhuo Chen, Li Zhu, Ruifan Yuan, Kaixuan Ren, Tianle Wang, Wenbin Ding
    Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases.2022; 31(10): 106634.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac output and cerebral blood flow during carotid surgery in regional versus general anesthesia: A prospective randomized controlled study
    Helmuth Tauber, Werner Streif, Jennifer Gebetsberger, Lukas Gasteiger, Eve Pierer, Michael Knoflach, Gustav Fraedrich, Maria Gummerer, Josef Fritz, Corinna Velik-Salchner
    Journal of Vascular Surgery.2021; 74(3): 930.     CrossRef
  • Cerebral and Systemic Stress Parameters in Correlation with Jugulo-Arterial CO2 Gap as a Marker of Cerebral Perfusion during Carotid Endarterectomy
    Zoltán Kovács-Ábrahám, Timea Aczél, Gábor Jancsó, Zoltán Horváth-Szalai, Lajos Nagy, Ildikó Tóth, Bálint Nagy, Tihamér Molnár, Péter Szabó
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(23): 5479.     CrossRef
  • Plexus anesthesia versus general anesthesia in patients for carotid endarterectomy with patch angioplasty: Protocol for a systematic review with meta-analyses and Trial Sequential Analysis of randomized clinical trials
    M. S. Marsman, J. Wetterslev, F. Keus, D. van Aalst, F. G. van Rooij, J. M.M. Heyligers, F. L. Moll, A. Kh. Jahrome, P. W.H.E Vriens, G. G. Koning
    International Journal of Surgery Protocols.2020; 19: 1.     CrossRef
Comparison of sevoflurane and propofol anesthesia on the incidence of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing lung surgery
Hyuckgoo Kim, Jisoo Han, Sung Mee Jung, Sang-Jin Park, Nyeong Keon Kwon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):54-62.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.54
  • 6,599 View
  • 100 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The type and regimen of anesthesia may affect perioperative hyperglycemia following major surgical stress. This study compared the effects of sevoflurane and propofol on the incidence of hyperglycemia and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing lung surgery.
Methods
This retrospective study included 176 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had undergone lung surgery. Blood glucose levels and clinical outcomes from the preoperative period to the first 2 postoperative days (PODs) were retrospectively examined in patients who received sevoflurane (group S, n= 87) and propofol (group P, n=89) for maintenance of general anesthesia. The primary endpoint was the incidence of persistent hyperglycemia (2 consecutive blood glucose levels >180 mg/dL [10.0 mmol/L]) during the perioperative period. The secondary composite endpoint was the incidence of major postoperative complications and 30-day mortality rate after surgery.
Results
Blood glucose levels similarly increased from the preoperative period to the second POD in both groups (p=0.857). Although blood glucose levels at 2 hours after surgery were significantly lower in group P than in group S (p=0.022; 95% confidence interval for mean difference, -27.154 to -2.090), there was no difference in the incidence of persistent hyperglycemia during the perioperative period (group S, 70%; group P, 69%; p=0.816). The composite of major postoperative complications and all-cause in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates were also comparable between the two groups.
Conclusion
Sevoflurane and propofol were associated with a comparable incidence of perioperative hyperglycemia and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing lung surgery.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Strategies for intraoperative glucose management: a scoping review
    Nathaniel Morin, Sarah Taylor, Danae Krahn, Leyla Baghirzada, Michael Chong, Tyrone G. Harrison, Anne Cameron, Shannon M. Ruzycki
    Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie.2023; 70(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Impact of total intravenous anesthesia and total inhalation anesthesia as the anesthesia maintenance approaches on blood glucose level and postoperative complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial
    Xinghui Xiong, Yong He, Cheng Zhou, Qin Zheng, Chan Chen, Peng Liang
    BMC Anesthesiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current trends in management of hyperglycaemia in surgical patients with diabetes mellitus: a review
    Vladimir N. Kuklin, J. Matri, N. P. Barlow, S. H. Tveit, J. E. Kvernberg, E. -M. Ringvold, V. Dahl
    Annals of Critical Care.2022; (4): 33.     CrossRef
  • Effects of sevoflurane anesthesia and abdominal surgery on the systemic metabolome: a prospective observational study
    Yiyong Wei, Donghang Zhang, Jin Liu, Mengchan Ou, Peng Liang, Yunxia Zuo, Cheng Zhou
    BMC Anesthesiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Reliability and validity of free software for the analysis of locomotor activity in mice
Yoo Rha Hong, Eunsoo Moon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):63-69.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.63
  • 7,412 View
  • 51 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Kinovea software that tracking semi-automatically the motion in video screen has been used to study motion-related tasks in several studies. However, the validation of this software in open field test to assess locomotor activity have not been studied yet. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the reliability and validity of this software in analyzing locomotor activities.
Methods
Thirty male Institute Cancer Research mice were subjected in this study. The results examined by this software and the classical method were compared. Test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability were analyzed with Pearson's correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The validity of this software was analyzed with Pearson's correlation coefficient.
Results
This software showed good test-retest reliability (ICC=0.997, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.975-0.994, p<0.001). This software also showed good inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.987, 95% CI=0.973-0.994, p<0.001). Furthermore, in three analyses for the validity of this software, there were significant correlations between two methods (Pearson's correlation coefficient=0.928-0.972, p<0.001). In addition, this software showed good reliability and validity in the analysis locomotor activity according to time interval.
Conclusion
This study showed that this software in analyzing drug-induced locomotor activity has good reliability and validity. This software can be effectively used in animal study using the analysis of locomotor activity.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Do It by Yourself: Larval Locomotion in the Black Soldier Fly Hermetia illucens, with a Novel “Self-Harvesting” Method to Separate Prepupae
    Daniele Giannetti, Enrico Schifani, Roberto Reggiani, Emanuele Mazzoni, Maria Cristina Reguzzi, Cristina Castracani, Fiorenza A. Spotti, Beatrice Giardina, Alessandra Mori, Donato A. Grasso
    Insects.2022; 13(2): 127.     CrossRef
Risk factors for persistent otitis media with effusion in children: a case-control study
Ju Yeon Lee, Se-Hyung Kim, Chan Il Song, Young Ree Kim, Yoon-Joo Kim, Jae Hong Choi
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):70-75.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.70
  • 5,494 View
  • 79 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Otitis media with effusion (OME) is defined as middle ear effusion without acute signs of infection. OME usually resolves spontaneously; however, persistent OME may require the insertion of a ventilation tube. This study investigated risk factors for persistent OME in children who undergo ventilation tube insertion.
Methods
Children who were admitted to undergo ventilation tube insertion at Jeju National University Hospital between August 2015 and July 2016 were enrolled as the case group. Healthy children without persistent OME from August 2016 to July 2017 were enrolled as the control group. Baseline characteristics and predisposing factor data were collected using an interview questionnaire. Middle ear fluids were collected from the case group.
Results
A total of 31 patients underwent ventilation tube insertion. The mean age of the case group was 4.53 years, with a male-to-female ratio of 21:10. Twenty-nine (93.5%) children attended a daycare center, and 21 (67.7%) had experience with bottle feeding. Fifteen (48.4%) children in the case group and 3 (9.7%) in the control group first attended a daycare center at <1 year of age (odds ratio=9.96; 95% confidence interval=2.44-39.70; p=0.001). No bacteria were found in middle ear fluid collected from the 31 operated children. Nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization was found in 13 (41.9%) and 17 (54.8%) children in the case and control groups, respectively.
Conclusion
Earlier attendance at a daycare center was the only predisposing factor for ventilation tube insertion in our study. The aseptic nature of middle ear fluids found in children with OME highlights the efficacy of antimicrobial use.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Otitis Media With Effusion After the COVID‐19 Pandemic: Return to the Past and New Lessons
    Mirko Aldè, Paola Marchisio, Francesco Folino, Umberto Ambrosetti, Federica Di Berardino, Stefania Barozzi, Diego Zanetti, Lorenzo Pignataro, Giovanna Cantarella
    Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of COVID-19 on nationwide pediatric otolaryngology: Otitis media and myringotomy tube trends
    David Z. Allen, Sai Challapalli, Sean McKee, Kyung Hyun Lee, Cynthia S. Bell, Soham Roy, Sarah Bowe, Karthik Balakrishnan, C.W. David Chang, Zhen Huang
    American Journal of Otolaryngology.2022; 43(2): 103369.     CrossRef
  • Special Considerations for Tympanoplasty Type I in the Oncological Pediatric Population: A Case-Control Study
    Celine Richard, Emily Baker, Joshua Wood
    Frontiers in Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Chemotherapy adherence is a favorable prognostic factor for elderly patients with multiple myeloma who are treated with a frontline bortezomib-containing regimen
Hee-Jeong Cho, Sang-Kyung Seo, Dong Won Baek, Sung-Woo Park, Yoo-Jin Lee, Sang-Kyun Sohn, Ho-Sup Lee, Won Sik Lee, Ji Hyun Lee, Sung Hyun Kim, Joon-Ho Moon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):76-83.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.76
  • 6,045 View
  • 49 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Elderly patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are vulnerable to adverse events (AEs). This study evaluated adherence to chemotherapy and treatment outcomes in elderly patients treated with a frontline bortezomib (BTZ), melphalan, and prednisone (VMP) regimen and regimens without BTZ.
Methods
One-hundred and forty elderly patients who were diagnosed with MM from March 2007 to March 2015 were included in this retrospective study. To evaluate regimen adherence, patients who were treated with more than 4 cycles were assigned to the good adherence group.
Results
Among the 140 patients, 71 were treated with a frontline VMP and 69 with non-BTZ regimens. The median age was 71 years (range, 65-90 years). The VMP group showed a higher complete response rate than the non-BTZ group: 26.8% vs. 7.2%. More patients in the VMP group achieved ≥very good partial response (VGPR) and ≥PR. In the VMP group, 27 patients (38.0%) received less than 4 cycles. The VMP good adherence group showed a higher 3-year overall survival (OS) rate (70.9%) than the poor adherence group (60.2%, p=0.059). In the multivariate analysis, treatment with ≥4 cycles of VMP was a favorable factor for OS.
Conclusion
A good adherence to a frontline VMP regimen resulted in favorable long-term survival. Adequate management of AEs will be needed to achieve favorable outcomes in elderly patients with MM.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Solomon Islands Oncology Unit: Sustainability in Terms of Outcomes
    Dylan Bush, Mark Love, Hugo Bugoro, Nixon Panda
    JCO Global Oncology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Real World Adherence to and Persistence With Oral Oncolytics in Multiple Myeloma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Abdallah Y. Naser, Richard Ofori-Asenso, Safaa Al Awawdeh, Sami Qadus, Hassan Alwafi, Danny Liew
    Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia.2022; 22(10): 760.     CrossRef
  • Oral therapy adherence and satisfaction in patients with multiple myeloma
    Marine Solano, Etienne Daguindau, Cyril Faure, Pierre Loriod, Coline Pain, Anne-Cécile Maes, Pauline Marguet, Marie Kroemer, Anne Rumpler, Jean Fontan, Eric Deconinck, Samuel Limat, Anne-Laure Clairet
    Annals of Hematology.2021; 100(7): 1803.     CrossRef
Case Reports
A successful management after preterm delivery in a patient with severe sepsis during third-trimester pregnancy
Moni Ra, Myungkyu Kim, Mincheol Kim, Sangwoo Shim, Seong Yeon Hong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):84-88.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.84
  • 5,574 View
  • 45 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 33-year-old woman visited the emergency department presenting with fever and dyspnea. She was pregnant with gestational age of 31 weeks and 6 days. She had dysuria for 7 days, and fever and dyspnea for 1 day. The vital signs were as follows: blood pressure 110/70 mmHg, heart rate 118 beats/minute, respiratory rate 28/minute, body temperature 38.7℃, and oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry 84% during inhalation of 5 liters of oxygen by nasal prongs. Crackles were heard over both lung fields. There were no signs of uterine contractions. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography scan showed multiple consolidations and air bronchograms in both lungs. According to urinalysis, there was pyuria and microscopic hematuria. She was diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia and urinary tract infection (UTI) that progressed to severe sepsis and acute respiratory failure. We found extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli in the blood culture and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the sputum culture. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit with administration of antibiotics and supplementation of high-flow oxygen. On hospital day 2, hypoxemia was aggravated. She underwent endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. After 3 hours, fetal distress was suspected. Under 100% fraction of inspired oxygen, her oxygen partial pressure was 87 mmHg in the arterial blood. She developed acute kidney injury and thrombocytopenia. We diagnosed her with multi-organ failure due to severe sepsis. After an emergent cesarean section, pneumonia, UTI, and other organ failures gradually recovered. The patient and baby were discharged soon thereafter.
Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension in an ankylosing spondylitis patient
Sukki Park, Ji Hyun Lee, Joon Sul Choi, Hyun Woo Kim, Beom Jin Shim, Won Kyu Choi, Sang Hyun Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):89-93.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.89
  • 7,643 View
  • 55 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) is a disease with an uncertain etiology consisting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension and portal pressure increase in the absence of liver cirrhosis. In INCPH, patients exhibit normal liver functions and structures. The factors associated with INCPH include the following: Umbilical/portal pyremia, bacterial diseases, prothrombic states, chronic exposure to arsenic, vinyl chloride monomers, genetic disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Approximately 70% of patients present a history of major variceal bleeding, and treatment relies on the prevention of complications related to portal hypertension. Autoimmune disorders associated with INCPH are mainly systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. To the best of our knowledge, a case of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) associated with INCPH has not been reported thus far. Therfore, we report our experience of a patient with AS accompanied by INCPH, who showed perisplenic varices with patent spleno-portal axis and hepatic veins along with no evidence of cirrhosis on liver biopsy, and provide a brief literature review.
Successful transradial intervention via a radial recurrent artery branch from the radioulnar alpha loop using a sheathless guiding catheter
Shin-Eui Yoon, Sangwook Park, Sung Gyun Ahn
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):94-98.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.94
  • 10,517 View
  • 33 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The radial artery is generally the preferred access route in coronary angiography and coronary intervention. However, small size, spasm, and anatomical variations concerning the radial artery are major limitations of transradial coronary intervention (TRI). We describe a successful case involving a patient with coronary artery disease who underwent TRI via a well-developed radial recurrent artery branch from the radioulnar alpha loop using a sheathless guiding catheter.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Minimizing Guidewire Unwilling Passage and Related Perforation During Transradial Procedures: Prevention Is Better Than Cure
    Lili Xu, Jiatian Cao, Meng Zhang, Hongbo Yang, Zheyong Huang, Yanan Song, Chenguang Li, Yuxiang Dai, Kang Yao, Xiangfei Wang, Feng Zhang, Juying Qian, Junbo Ge
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Mammary Paget’s disease without underlying malignancy of the breast
Nuri Jang, Suhwan Kang, Young Kyung Bae
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):99-103.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.99
  • 5,772 View
  • 49 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mammary Paget’s disease (MPD) is usually accompanied by underlying breast malignancy; however, a few cases have been reported as only skin lesions without any evidence of malignancy of the breast on imaging tests and microscopic examination of surgical specimen. Here, we describe a 47-year-old woman who visited our hospital who had an eczematous lesion on right nipple and areola for over 10 years. The lesion was diagnosed as Paget’s disease by punch biopsy; however, imaging studies demonstrated no breast malignancy or lymph node metastasis. The patient underwent surgery of on the nipple and areola including underlying breast tissue. No underlying malignancy was found upon microscopic examination, except for Paget’s disease. Immunohistochemical stains revealed that the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 7, and negativity for p63, cytokeratin 5/6, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. We report a case of MPD without underlying malignancy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case reported in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • ‘Eczematous’ dermatitis of the nipple: clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis of Paget disease
    Hatice B. Zengin, Puay Hoon Tan, Regina Liu, Bruce R. Smoller
    Pathology.2024; 56(3): 300.     CrossRef
  • An unusual case of longstanding mammary Paget disease presenting with reticulated skin changes
    S. K. Dhariwal, E. Rytina, J. C. Sterling
    Clinical and Experimental Dermatology.2021; 46(4): 748.     CrossRef
  • Histopathological patterns of skin adnexal tumours in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria
    OmoladeO Adegoke, MustaphaAkanji Ajani
    Hamdan Medical Journal.2021; 14(4): 168.     CrossRef
  • Clinicopathological characteristics of mammary Paget’s disease: A single‐center 25‐year experience in Korea
    Young J. Kim, Keon H. Lee, Woo J. Lee, Chong H. Won, Sung E. Chang, Jee H. Choi, Mi W. Lee
    The Breast Journal.2020; 26(4): 806.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science