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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Jin Deok Joo 2 Articles
Enhancing ketamine anesthesia with midazolam and fentanyl for children’s ear surgery: a prospective randomized study
Seong Min Han, So Young Kwon, Jang Hyeok In, Jin Deok Joo
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2024;41(3):207-212.   Published online May 23, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2024.00276
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  • 29 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Myringotomy with tympanostomy tube insertion (MTI) is a superficial surgical procedure used to prevent hearing loss in children with serous otitis media. Intravenous anesthesia, often ketamine, is preferred for this procedure because of its ability to induce sedation without compromising airway reflexes. However, ketamine alone may be insufficient and potentially lead to spontaneous movement during surgery. This study evaluated the effectiveness of midazolam and fentanyl as adjuvants to ketamine in reducing spontaneous movement during MTI and enhancing the quality of recovery.
Methods
This study involved two groups of 30 patients each: one group received intravenous ketamine (1.5 mg/kg) with an equal volume of normal saline (K group), while the other received a combination of midazolam, fentanyl, and ketamine (0.05 mg/kg, 1 μg/kg, and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively; MFK group). We assessed side effects, intraoperative patient movement, surgeon satisfaction, and emergence agitation scores.
Results
The MFK group exhibited significantly lower scores for patient movement (p<0.01) and emergence agitation (p<0.01) and markedly higher surgeon satisfaction scores (p<0.01) than the K group.
Conclusion
Administering a midazolam-fentanyl-ketamine combination effectively reduced spontaneous movement during surgery and emergence agitation during recovery without prolonging discharge times in children undergoing MTI.
Comparison of the efficacy of erector spinae plane block according to the difference in bupivacaine concentrations for analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a retrospective study
Yoo Jung Park, Sujung Chu, Eunju Yu, Jin Deok Joo
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(2):172-178.   Published online September 23, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00500
  • 2,200 View
  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is a noninvasive surgery, but postoperative pain is a major problem. Studies have indicated that erector spinae plane block (ESPB) has an analgesic effect after LC. We aimed to compare the efficacy of different ESPB anesthetic concentrations in pain control in patients with LC.
Methods
This retrospective study included patients aged 20 to 75 years scheduled for LC with the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification I or II. ESPB was administered using 0.375% bupivacaine in group 1 and 0.25% in group 2. Both groups received general anesthesia. Postoperative tramadol consumption and pain scores were compared and intraoperative and postoperative fentanyl requirements in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) were measured.
Results
Eighty-five patients were included in this analysis. Tramadol consumption in the first 12 hours, second 12 hours, and total 24 hours was similar between groups (p>0.05). The differences between postoperative numeric rating scale (NRS) scores at rest did not differ significantly. The postoperative NRS scores upon bodily movement were not statistically different between the two groups, except at 12 hours. The mean intraoperative and postoperative fentanyl requirements in the PACU were similar. The difference in the requirement for rescue analgesics was not statistically significant (p=0.788).
Conclusion
Ultrasound-guided ESPB performed with different bupivacaine concentrations was effective in both groups for LC analgesia, with similar opioid consumption. A lower concentration of local anesthetic can be helpful for the safety of regional anesthesia and is recommended for the analgesic effect of ESPB in LC.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science