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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Case report
Development of donepezil-induced hypokalemia following treatment of cognitive impairment
Dongryul Kim, Hye Eun Yoon, Hoon Suk Park, Seok Joon Shin, Bum Soon Choi, Byung Soo Kim, Tae Hyun Ban
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(1):65-69.   Published online June 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00269
  • 6,085 View
  • 134 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Donepezil is a cholinesterase inhibitor used extensively to treat Alzheimer disease. The increased cholinergic activity is associated with adverse effects, therefore gastrointestinal symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, are common. Hypokalemia is a rare adverse event that occurs in less than 1% of donepezil-treated patients. Although hypokalemia of mild and moderate grade does not present serious signs and symptoms, severe hypokalemia often results in prolonged hospitalization and mortality. Herein, we report a case of hypokalemia developed after the initiation of donepezil therapy for cognitive impairment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Thymus vulgaris Essential Oil Protects Zebrafish against Cognitive Dysfunction by Regulating Cholinergic and Antioxidants Systems
    Luminita Capatina, Elena Todirascu-Ciornea, Edoardo Marco Napoli, Giuseppe Ruberto, Lucian Hritcu, Gabriela Dumitru
    Antioxidants.2020; 9(11): 1083.     CrossRef
Case Report
A Case of Primary Aldosteronism Accompanied by Hypokalemic Rhabdomyolysis.
Hong Ik Kim, Sang Ah Baek, Hyun Sik Hwang, Woo Hyun Lee, Gun Woo Kang, In Hee Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2012;29(2):113-117.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2012.29.2.113
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  • 3 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Primary aldosteronism is characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis, associated with excessive aldosterone production and suppressed plasma renin activity. Hypokalemia-induced rhabdomyolysis has been rarely reported in primary aldosteronism patients. This paper reports a case of primary aldosteronism presented with rhabdomyolysis due to severe hypokalemia. A 48-year-old male with a three-year history of hypertension presented himself at the authors' hospital with generalized weakness and myalgia in both legs over a period of several days. His laboratory findings showed hypokalemia (1.8 mEq/L) with elevations of his serum creatine phosphokinase and serum myoglobin. His plasma aldosterone level was also elevated, and his plasma renin activity was reduced. An abdominal computed tomography revealed a 2.0 cm hypodense mass in the left adrenal gland, which suggested adrenal adenoma. The accordingly underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Three months later, his plasma potassium level and blood pressure became normal without the use of medications.

Citations

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  • Primary Aldosteronism Presenting as Hypokalemia and Rhabdomyolysis
    Kee Hong Park, Soo-Kyung Kim, Eun Bin Cho, Heejeong Jeong, Nack-Cheon Choi, Oh-Young Kwon, Byeong Hoon Lim, Jong Ryeal Hahm, Ki-Jong Park
    Korean Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology.2016; 18(1): 21.     CrossRef
Original Article
Clinical Aspects in Patients with Thyrotoxic Periodic Hypokalemic Paralysis.
Sang Yob Nam, Jae Hong Kim, Jung Hyn Oh, Jin Chul Park, Hyun Dae Yoon, Kyu Chang Won, Ihn Ho Cho, Hyoung Woo Lee, Cha Kyung Sung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1999;16(2):228-236.   Published online December 31, 1999
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1999.16.2.228
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is an uncommon illness characterized by intermittent flaccid paralysis of skeletal muscle, usually accompanied by hypokalemia, in patient with hyperthyroidism. However. the pathophysiology of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis remains largely unexplained and controversial. This report describes the clnical and biochemical findings in 19 patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis who were examined at the Yeungnam University Medical Center (YUMC) during the past decade. METHODS: The medical records of 997 YUMC patients, seen between 1986 and 1996, with dignosis of hyperthyroidism were reviewed. Nineteen patients out of 997 hyperthyrodism patients were diagnosed, and examined by history, physical examination, serum electrolyte value, and thyroid function test during paralysis. On the basis of these results, compasons were made on age. sex, precipitating factors, timing, affected limbs, prognosis, serum potassium and serum phosphate and thyroid hormone levels. RESULTS: the prevalence of periodic paralysis in hyperthyroidism was 1.9 percent and the male to female prevalence ratio was 30:1 and in all patients, the development of perodic paralysis was correlated with hyperfuntional state of the throid gland. Eleven cases of periodic paralysis were associated with hypokalemia and their throid hormon levels were significantly more increased than those of the patients without hypokalemia. interestingly, our study shows the recurrence of paralysis after treatment. CONCLUSION: Although the precise pathophysiology of the disease is as yet undefined and controversial, it occurs primarily in Asians with an overwhelming male preponderance and prevalence of 2 percent in hyperthyrodism. The interactive roles of thyroid hormon. Na-K pump. and genetically inherited defect in the celluar membrance potential of the skeletal muscle can be speculated. Further investigation will be neede to firmly establish the mechanism of thyrotoxic periodic paraysis.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science