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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Young Soo Kim 8 Articles
2 cases of male urethral diverticulum combined with stone.
Hyun Chul Shin, Young Soo Kim, Tong Choon Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1992;9(2):416-421.   Published online December 31, 1992
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1992.9.2.416
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Male urethral diverticulum is uncommon lesion, furthermore calculus formation within the male urethral diverticulum is very rare. Generally, urethral diverticula are classified as congenital and acquired. The majority of male urethral diverticula are acquired and approximately 10 to 20 per cent are congenital. Acquired urethral diverticula in the male may arise from many sources, including infection (prostatic abscess, infection of periurethral glands, hematoma or schistosomiasis), obstruction (stricture, impacted stone, Cunningham clamp or condom catheter) and trauma (instrumentation, external injury and pelvic fracture). Calculi formation is more common in the acquired diverticulum owing to stagnation of urine and infection. These calculi in the diverticulum usually are solitary and may attain considerable size with predisposing factors, 1) a ureteral or bladder calculus that is lodged in the urethra 2) urethral trauma or stricture, 3) calcification around a foreign body or hair. The treatment of urethral diverticulum combined with stone is excision of the diverticula with removal of stone. We treated two cases of urethral diverticulum combined with stone in the male, and report with review of literature.
A case of giant lymph node hyperplasia in the spermatic cord.
Hyun Chul Shin, Young Soo Kim, Tong Choon Park, Young Ran Shim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1992;9(1):175-180.   Published online June 30, 1992
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1992.9.1.175
  • 1,387 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Giant lymph node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease) is a rare disease, which represents a peculiar form of lymph node hyperplasia. Generally, it has been considered as benign and localized disease but recently, revealed malignant transformation in some cases of multicentric form. It usually occurs on the mediastinum and occasionally neck, lung, axilla, mesentery, broad ligament, retroperitoneum or soft tissue of extremities. Histopathologically, it is divided into hyaline vascular or plasma cell type and the former is characterized with prominent vascular proliferation and hyalinization in the central portion and tight concentric layering of lymphocytes at the periphery of the follicles (mantle zone) and the latter is characterized by a diffuse plasma cell proliferation in the interfollicular area. From the point of view of clinical presentation, it has been divided into solitary form, which presents as a localized mass located most commonly in the mediastinum, and multicentric form, which occurs multiple location and has systemic manifestation and transformation into malignancy. Herein we report a case of Giant lymph node hyperplasia occurring in the left spermatic cord in a 58-year old male with brief review of literatures.
Clinical Experiences of the Ureteroscopic Management for the Lower Ureteral Stone.
Seong Jong Mo, Young Soo Kim, Jun Kyu Suh, Tong Choon Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1990;7(2):97-102.   Published online December 31, 1990
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1990.7.2.97
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Ureteroscopic removal of the stone is now popular for the management of the lower ureteral stone. A clinical study was performed on our 75 patients with lower ureteral stone treated with ureteroscopy. Of the 75 stone manipulations 62 (83%) were immediately successful and the final success rate including spontaneous delivery of stone or fragment after the procedure was 87 percents (65 cases). Of 57 smaller calculi than 1 cm (radiographic largest diameter) 50 (88%) were removed successfully. Mean duration of postoperative hospitalization was 5.6 days. There were no interrelations between the success rate and anesthetic methods. Significant complications during or after procedure were not identified. We conclude that ureteroscopic removal of stones under direct vision can be done safely and be the first choice of procedure for the lower ureteral stones.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Clinical Case Report of Severe Hematuria Patient after Ureterolith Lithotripsy
    Sang Hyun Lee, Ju Yong Jeong, Myoung Rae Cho
    Korean Journal of Acupuncture.2015; 32(3): 144.     CrossRef
One Case of Incomplete Double Urethra.
Seong Jong Mo, Young Soo Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1988;5(2):235-238.   Published online December 31, 1988
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1988.5.2.235
  • 1,459 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Duplication of the urethra within a single penile shaft is a rare anomaly. These can be divided into those that are in the sagittal plane, which is most common, and those that occur side by side. In some cases, the accessory channel is complete, having a separate bladder opening and no communication with the more normal ventral urethra. In other cases, the accessory urethra is incomplete, either ending blindly or communicating with the urethra distal to the bladder neck. We report on a 20-year-old male with incomplete double urethra.
A Case of Fibrous Pseudotumor of Testicular Tunic.
Kee Cheol Yang, Young Soo Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1988;5(2):231-234.   Published online December 31, 1988
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1988.5.2.231
  • 1,453 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
A relatively rare and puzzling tumor of the testicular tunic is reported. The tumor, so called a fibrous pseudotumor of testicular tunics, in presented because of the clinical dilemma this rare entity causes urologists and pathologists. This report demonstrates the necessity for familiarity with testicular pseudotumors in order to avoid an unnecessary orchiectomy.
Safe Placement of Urethral Foley Catheter Using Guide Wire in Patient with False Passage.
Young Soo Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1988;5(1):101-104.   Published online June 30, 1988
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1988.5.1.101
  • 1,332 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
No abstract available.
Prostatic Urethral Polyp Causing Lower Urinary Tract Obstruction: Report of a Case.
Dong Heon Lee, Jun Kyu Suh, Young Soo Kim, Tong Choon Park, Hae Joo Nam, Won Hee Choi, Tae Sook Lee, Kyung Chul Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1985;2(1):249-252.   Published online December 31, 1985
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1985.2.1.249
  • 1,467 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Polyps of the male urethra are relatively uncommon lesions, They usually arise from the prostatic urethra mostly verumontanum or just lateral to the verumontanum. Posterior urethral polyp often presents with hematuria, hemospermia and sometimes lower urinary tract obstruction. We recently experienced a pedunculated prostatic urethral polyp in a 63-year-old man who complained of gross total hematuria and difficult micturition for several years. On rectal examination the prostate was slightly enlarged with normal consistency. Excretory urogram showed a round filling defect in the right side of the bladder neck measuring about 2×2 cm in size. Cystourethroscopy revealed trabeculation of the vesical wall, mild bilateral prostatic hypertrophy and a round cystic mass with a long stalk arising from the prostatic floor 1cm. Proximal to the verumontanum which caused ball-valve obstruction in the bladder neck. This pedunculated polypoid mass was then resected at its base with resectoscope and was removed transurethrally using Lowsley's grasping forceps. The specimen was proved as fibrous polyp histologically.
Transurethral Dormia Dislodging in Patients with Lower Ureteral Stone.
Eun Gill Kim, Jun Kyu Suh, Young Soo Kim, Tong Choon Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1985;2(1):81-85.   Published online December 31, 1985
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1985.2.1.81
  • 1,351 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Management of the small lower ureteral stone has been attempted by either transurethral manipulation or expectant therapy. To date, however, the choice of proper method has depended mostly on clinician's preference, and the effectiveness of the transurethral stone manipulation has remained controversial. Herein we evaluated the effectiveness of the transurethral stone manipulation, using with the Dormia dislodger, in 37 patients with lower ureteral stone less than 10mm in greatest diameter. The results are summarized as follows. 1. The overall success rate was 68% (25 of 37 patients); Immediate delivery of the stone was observed in 16 of 37 patients. In another 5 patients the stone was removed at the time when the indwelled ureteral catheter was taken out. In the remaining 4 patients the stone passed spontaneously within a week following the procedure. 2. Higher success rate was observed in smaller stone; 79% in less than 4 mm, 58% in 46 mm, and 33% in 610 mm in it's greatest diameter, respectively. 3. The morbidity rate was 8.1% (3 of 37 patients); In one patient a broken basket was retained in the ureter, which was removed at the time of ureterolithotomy. In another patient a ureteral stricture requiring periodic dilation was complicated. And in the other patient persistent hematuria was observed, which was relieved by conservative management. These results suggest that transurethral manipulation might have to be initially applied to unremittingly painful patients with small lower ureteral stone.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science