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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Sung Hwan Lim 2 Articles
Diagnostic Sensitivity of Several Muscles in Repetitive Nerve Stimulation Test for Myasthenia Gravis.
Hyun Jic Kim, Sung Hwan Lim, Seung Yeop Lee, Jung Sang Hah, Wook Nyeon Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2001;18(2):277-286.   Published online December 31, 2001
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2001.18.2.277
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BACKGROUND
This study was undertaken to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity of several muscles in repetitive nerve stimulation test (RNST) for myasthenia gravis (MG) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 39 MG patients classified by modified Ossermann's classification. Using Stalberg's method, RNST was systematically performed in facial (orbicularis oculi and nasalis) and upper extremity (flexor carpi ulnaris, abductor digiti quinti and anconeus) muscles. RESULTS: The significant electrodecremental response of RNST were noted in orbicularis oculi (58.9%), nasalis (51.3%), flexor carpi ulnaris (42%), anconeus (41%) and abductor digiti quinti muscles (27%). Among the 3 muscles of upper extremity (abductor digiti quinti, flexor carpi ulnaris and anconeus), the positive electrodecremental response of anconeus muscles was significantly higher than other two muscles (p<0.05) in type IIa, IIb and there were no statistical differences of the positive electrodecremental response between orbicularis oculi and nasalis muscles. The facial muscles showed more prominent decremental responses than upper extremity muscles in type I MG(p<0.05). In type IIa MG patients, there were no significant statistical differences between facial and upper extremity muscles but significant statistical differences among upper extremity muscles. In type IIb MG patients, there were no significant statistical differences in all tested muscles in spite of the increased positive electrodecremental response of RNST. CONCLUSION: On the basis of this study, RNST would be initially performed for the orbicularis or nasalis in type I MG and for the anconeus in type IIa or IIb MG.
A case of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome showing vegetation on the mitral valve through echocardiography.
Seung Yeop Lee, Seung Kwon Park, Sung Hwan Yun, Yun Seok Jung, Hyen Jik Kim, Sung Hwan Lim, Jung Sang Hah, Wook Nyeun Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1998;15(2):350-358.   Published online December 31, 1998
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1998.15.2.350
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Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome(APS) is a well-known clinical syndrome characterized by recurrent arterial or venous thromboses, recurrent fetal loss, thrombocytopenia, together with high titers of sustained anticardiolipin antibody(aCL) or lupus anticoagulant(LA). Although systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) and APS may coexist, a high proportion of patients manifesting the APS do not suffer from classical lupus or other connective tissue disease. The patient has been defined as having a primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. We experienced one case of primary APS with recurrent fetal loss, recurrent cerebral infarctions, positive anticardiolipin antibody IgG and fluttering vegetation on the mitral valve, without other connective tissue diseases including SLE. Forty-three old female had 2 out of 11 criteria for the diagnosis of SLE, such as thrombocytopenia and positive antinuclear antibody, but did not meet whole criteria. The patient was treated with ticlopidine, and anticoagulant therapy was recommended.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science