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Joon Sakong 15 Articles
Cytotoxicity of dental self-curing resin for a temporary crown: an in vitro study
Jae-wan Ko, Joon Sakong, Sohee Kang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(Suppl):S1-S8.   Published online April 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.00080
  • 1,209 View
  • 73 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Residual monomer tests using high-performance liquid chromatography and cytotoxicity tests were performed to analyze the effect on the oral mucosa of a self-curing resin for provisional crown production.
Methods
A cytotoxicity test was performed to confirm whether leaked residual monomers directly affected oral mucosal cells. The cytotoxicity of the liquid and solid resin polymers was measured using a water-soluble tetrazolium (WST) test and microplate reader.
Results
In the WST assay using a microplate reader, 73.4% of the cells survived at a concentration of 0.2% liquid resin polymer. The cytotoxicity of the liquid resin polymer was low at ≤0.2%. For the solid resins, when 100% of the eluate was used from each specimen, the average cell viability was 91.3% for the solid resin polymer and 100% for the hand-mixed self-curing resin, which is higher than the cell viability standard of 70%. The cytotoxicity of the solid resin polymer was low.
Conclusion
Because the polymerization process of the self-curing resin may have harmful effects on the oral mucosa during the second and third stages, the solid resin should be manufactured indirectly using a dental model.
Association between dental amalgam restoration and urine mercury concentrations among young women: a cross-sectional study
Su-Bin Park, Eun-Kyong Kim, Joon Sakong, Eun Young Park
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):373-380.   Published online March 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00955
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  • 55 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The association between dental amalgam fillings and urine mercury concentrations was investigated in this study to assess the health risks associated with dental amalgams.
Methods
This cross-sectional study included 99 women in their 20s who visited the dental clinic in Daegu, Korea. The 99 participants were composed of 68 subjects who had dental amalgam fillings (exposure group) and 31 subjects who did not have dental amalgam fillings (nonexposure group). Oral examinations were conducted by a single dental hygienist, sociodemographic features were investigated as confounding variables, and urine mercury concentrations were measured using an automatic mercury analyzer.
Results
The mean±standard deviation of the urine mercury concentrations of the exposure and nonexposure groups were 1.50±1.78 μg/g creatinine and 0.53±0.63 μg/g creatinine, respectively. The exposure group showed significantly higher levels than the nonexposure group (p<0.01). The urine mercury concentration significantly increased with an increase in the number of teeth filled with amalgam, cavity surfaces involved, and number of defective amalgam fillings, and according to the latest exposure time (p<0.001). In the multiple regression analysis of amalgam-related factors and urine mercury concentrations after correction for confounding factors, the urine mercury concentration in the group with six or more amalgam-filled teeth, 11 or more cavity surfaces, and two or more defective amalgams was significantly higher than that in the nonexposure group (p<0.001).
Conclusion
According to this study, exposure to dental amalgams was confirmed to significantly affect urine mercury concentrations.
Rates and subsequent clinical course of fetal congenital anomalies detected by prenatal targeted ultrasonography of 137 cases over 5 years in a single institute: a retrospective observational study
Haewon Choi, Hyo-Shin Kim, Joon Sakong
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(3):268-275.   Published online November 2, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00514
  • 1,401 View
  • 55 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
With the establishment of international guidelines and changes in insurance policies in Korea, the role of targeted ultrasonography has increased. This study aimed to identify the rates and clinical course of anomalies detected using prenatal targeted ultrasonography.
Methods
This study was a retrospective analysis of all pregnancies with targeted ultrasonography performed in a single secondary medical center over 5 years.
Results
Fetal anomalies were detected by targeted ultrasonography in 137 of the 8,147 cases (1.7%). The rates of anomalies were significantly higher in female fetuses (2.0% vs. 1.3%). In cases of female fetuses, the rate of anomalies was significantly higher in the advanced maternal age group (2.4% vs. 1.2%). In cases of male fetuses, the rate of anomalies was significantly higher in nulliparous (2.4% vs. 1.5%) and twin (5.7% vs. 1.9%) pregnancies. Pulmonary anomalies were significantly more common in the multiparity group (17.6% vs. 5.8%). Among the 137 cases, 17.5% terminated the pregnancy, 16.8% were diagnosed as normal after birth, and 42.3% were diagnosed with anomalies after birth or required follow-up.
Conclusion
Through the first study on the rates and clinical course of anomalies detected by targeted ultrasonography at a single secondary center in Korea, we found that artificial abortions were performed at a high rate, even for relatively mild anomalies or anomalies with good prognosis. We suggest the necessity of a nationwide study to establish clinical guidelines based on actual incidences or prognoses.
Satisfaction of industrial health care managers regarding the work of industrial hygiene engineers: a cross-sectional study
Byung Sik Choi, Min Keun Kim, Joon Sakong
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(1):58-64.   Published online May 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00073
  • 1,796 View
  • 50 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
A group health service is a system that delegates workplace health management to an entrusted institution. There have been various studies on group health services to date, but recent changes, such as an increase in foreign workers, are rapidly changing industry characteristics.
Methods
Satisfaction was assessed using a 27-question survey distributed among 203 workplaces employing health professionals. The survey items consisted of general characteristics, comprehensive satisfaction, requirements for health professionals’ work, and satisfaction with work environment management, ergonomic management, and healthcare management. Multiple regression and frequency analyses were performed.
Results
The comprehensive satisfaction was 4.08 points on average, out of 5. The comprehensive satisfaction of health professionals in the industry was positively correlated with each factor. Hazardous materials and chemical management (material safety data sheets, MSDSs) were the most common requirements.
Conclusion
A low level of satisfaction with work environment management indicates high demand for healthcare management. The working environment should be improved by identifying characteristics of the workplace, examining harmful substances, inspecting equipment, and enhancing worker methods. The shorter the work experience of health professionals, the more dependent they are on group health services. The variables affecting comprehensive satisfaction were the period of work, healthcare management satisfaction, and work environment management satisfaction. Most of the requirements of health professionals in the workplace were practical improvement case presentations, MSDSs, and legal document management.
Health Effects of Mercury Exposure through Fish.
Joon Sakong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2011;28(2):105-115.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2011.28.2.105
  • 1,730 View
  • 18 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mercury is atoxic, persistent pollutant that bioaccumulates and biomagnifies through food webs. People are exposed to methylmercury mainly through their diet, especially through the consumption of freshwater and marine fish and of other animals that consumefish (e.g., marinemammals). All humans are exposed to low levels of mercury. Dietary patterns can increase exposure toafish-eating population wherethefish and seafood arecontaminated with mercury. The primary toxicity targets of mercury and mercury compounds are the nervous system, kidneys, and cardiovascular system. It is generally accepted that developing organ systems are most sensitive to the toxic effects of mercury. The fetal-brain mercury levels appear to be significantly higherthan the maternal-blood mercury levels,and the developingcentralnervoussystem of the fetus is currently regarded as the main system of concern as it demonstrates the greatest sensitivity. The subpopulation that may be at greater risk for mercury toxicity are those exposed to higher levels of methylmercury due to carnivorous fish, including sharks.

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  • 어패류의 구매 및 소비 패턴에 따른 소비자 영양, 위생, 안전 인식 분석
    용희 석, 민준 이, 성희 민, 선희 채, 선옥 함
    Korean Journal of Food and Cookery Science.2023; 39(4): 288.     CrossRef
  • Women, Environment, and Health
    박은교, 하은희, 김규연
    JOURNAL OF THE KOREAN SOCIETY OF MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH.2014; 18(1): 54.     CrossRef
  • Reference levels of blood mercury and association with metabolic syndrome in Korean adults
    Sang-Yong Eom, Sun-Hee Choi, Su-Ju Ahn, Dong-Kyeong Kim, Dong-Won Kim, Ji-Ae Lim, Byung-Sun Choi, Hye-Jung Shin, Sin-Weon Yun, Hae-Jung Yoon, Yu-Mi Kim, Young-Seoub Hong, Yong-Woon Yun, Seok-Joon Sohn, Heon Kim, Kyung-Su Park, Hee-Soo Pyo, Ho Kim, Se-Youn
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health.2014; 87(5): 501.     CrossRef
Estimation of Secondhand Smoke Exposure in Clubs Based on Urinary Cotinine Levels.
Yu Jin Lee, Young Ji Lee, Man Joong Jeon, Joon Sakong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2011;28(1):45-53.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2011.28.1.45
  • 1,499 View
  • 2 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Increasing numbers of young people go to clubs. In Korea, however, no studies have been conducted regarding the exposure of club patrons to secondhand smoke. The present study was conducted to evaluate the degree of club customers' exposure to secondhand smoke. METHODS: The study subjects included 10 male and 12 female non-smokers. The investigational site was a club located in Daegu. Urine samples were collected before exposure to secondhand smoke in the club and 6 hours after a 3-hour exposure. The urine cotinine levels were measured via the LC-MS/MS method. A survey was conducted to collect data regarding the subjects' smoking experiences and the degree of exposure to secondhand smoke in their daily lives. RESULTS: The average urine cotinine level increased from 1.09 microg/L to 5.55 microg/L (p<0.05). No significant difference existed in the change in urine cotinine level between the male and female subjects. In addition, there was no significant difference in the change in urine cotinine level by the degree of exposure to secondhand smoke in daily life. CONCLUSIONS: The average urine cotinine level in all the subjects significantly increased after exposure to secondhand smoke. This is the first study on exposure to secondhand smoke in clubs; these results can be used to craft measures that reduce exposure to secondhand smoke in public places, such as clubs.

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  • Level of Blood Lead and Urine Cotinine of Residents by Area
    Yu-Jin Oh, Hyoung-Wook Kim, Yun-Jae Kim, Yoon-Deok Han, Sung-Hyeon Jung, Jong-Dae Lee, Bong-Ki Jang, Jin-Heon Lee, Bu-Soon Son
    Journal of Environmental Science International.2019; 28(3): 329.     CrossRef
Risks Associated with Contamination of Environment by Abandoned Mines
Joon Sakong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2 Suppl):S212-220.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2S.S212
  • 1,290 View
  • 9 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
About 1,000 metal mines have been abandoned all over the country in the Korea. Major reasons for mine closure may be mainly due to poor economies of the commodity making mining unprofitable, and technical difficulties. Abandoned mines are known to contaminate soil, surface water, and private drinking water wells with toxic metals and arsenic (As). Little attention is given, however, to sites in rural areas with low population densities where natural, geologic sources of contaminants might also occur. Abandoned heavy metal mines have been identified as one of the major concerns because of their significant long-term environmental problems. The topic of abandoned mines is complex because of the associated financial and legal liability implications. 1) In the Korea, most of the metal mine were in operation from 1940s to 1970s, before ceasing operation because of the decline in world market price for the commodity. Mine-waste calcines (retorted ore) were produced during mining and these calcines were dumped into nearby mine. It is estimated that about 50,000 people reside in the nearby abandoned mines. Recently the Korean government decided to apply public health assessment for the investigation of increasing complaints of unusual symptoms or public concern among residents of vicinity of abandoned mines. Several health reports revealed significant elevation of blood lead, cadmium, mercury and urine arsenic levels exceeding the background level or recommended exposure level. Even though the heavy metal specific toxic symptoms were not found, the association was seen between high blood metal levels and the distance from dumping area to residential district. These findings emphasizes the need to test soil, corps and drinking water in the vicinity of abandoned mines to determine the extent of risk to human health and to reduce the estimated carcinogenic risk and the noncarcinogenic hazard.

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  • Association between levels of exposure to heavy metals and renal function indicators of residents in environmentally vulnerable areas
    Jung-Yeon Kwon, Seungho Lee, Ulziikhishig Surenbaatar, Hyoun-Ju Lim, Byoung-Gwon Kim, Sang-Yong Eom, Yong Min Cho, Woo Jin Kim, Byeng-Chul Yu, Kwan Lee, Young-Seoub Hong
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Water Consumption as Source of Arsenic, Chromium, and Mercury in Children Living in Rural Yucatan, Mexico: Blood and Urine Levels
    F. Arcega-Cabrera, L. F. Fargher, I. Oceguera-Vargas, E. Noreña-Barroso, L. Yánez-Estrada, J. Alvarado, L. González, R. Moo-Puc, N. Pérez-Herrera, M. Quesadas-Rojas, S. Pérez-Medina
    Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.2017; 99(4): 452.     CrossRef
  • Blood levels of cadmium and lead in residents near abandoned metal mine areas in Korea
    Dong-UK Park, Dae-Seon Kim, Seung-Do Yu, Kyeong-Min Lee, Seung-Hun Ryu, Soo-Geun Kim, Won-Ho Yang, Doo-Yong. Park, Yeong-Seoub Hong, Jung-Duck Park, Byung-Kook Lee, Jai-Dong Moon, Joon Sakong, Seung-Chul Ahn, Jung-Min Ryu, Soon-Won Jung
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment.2014; 186(8): 5209.     CrossRef
  • Blood Cadmium Concentration of Residents Living near Abandoned Metal Mines in Korea
    Young-Seoub Hong, Byung-Kook Lee, Jung-Duck Park, Joon Sakong, Jae-Wook Choi, Jai-Dong Moon, Dae-Seon Kim, Byoung-Gwon Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2014; 29(5): 633.     CrossRef
  • Association of arsenic levels in soil and water with urinary arsenic concentration of residents in the vicinity of closed metal mines
    YongMin Cho, SungChul Seo, Seung-Hyun Choi, SeungKil Lee, KyungHee Kim, Hae-Joon Kim, Jae-Wook Choi
    International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health.2013; 216(3): 255.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of exposure to heavy metals and health risks among residents near abandoned metal mines in Goseong, Korea
    Kyunghee Ji, Jungkon Kim, Minjung Lee, Soyoung Park, Ho-Jang Kwon, Hae-Kwan Cheong, Jae-Yeon Jang, Dae-Seon Kim, Seungdo Yu, Young-Wook Kim, Kwang-Young Lee, Seoung-Oh Yang, Ik Jae Jhung, Won-Ho Yang, Do-Hyun Paek, Yun-Chul Hong, Kyungho Choi
    Environmental Pollution.2013; 178: 322.     CrossRef
  • Blood lead levels of residents living around 350 abandoned metal mines in Korea
    Nam-Soo Kim, Joon Sakong, Jae-Wook Choi, Young-Seoub Hong, Jai-Dong Moon, Byung-Kook Lee
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment.2012; 184(7): 4139.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Exposure Factors on the Concentration of Heavy Metals in Residents Near Abandoned Metal Mines
    Sanghoo Kim, Yong-Min Cho, Seung-Hyun Choi, Hae-Joon Kim, Jaewook Choi
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2011; 44(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Heavy Metal Concentrations in the Soil with the Blood and Urine of Residents around Abandoned Metal Mines
    Bong-Ki Jang, Sang-Il Park, Nam-Soo Kim, Kyung-Sick Jung, Byung-Kook Lee, Jong-Wha Lee
    Korean Journal of Environmental Health Sciences.2011; 37(5): 348.     CrossRef
Effects of Noise in Hospital on Patients and Employees
Mi Hwa Lee, Joon Sakong, Pock-Soo Kang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2 Suppl):S352-364.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2S.S352
  • 1,508 View
  • 17 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
:The purpose of this study was to estimate noise levels in hospital and effects of noise on patients and staff members and provide basic information required for reducing noise and improving working environment in hospital. Material and Methods:A structured questionnaire was served to patients and employees at a general hospital based in Daegu during the period from December 2004 to January 2005. Noise levels were measured at locations where noise level was high in the hospital.
Results
:Of total employee respondents, 95.8% cited work interruption and 94.5% cited interruption in conversation as noise disturbance. Also, 98.7% of total employees respondents regarded noise in hospital as a nuisance. Those working in intensive care units (58.8%) and boiler maintenance room (66.7%) said noise level was high all day. Those working in Nutrition Division (47.5%) said noise level was high in the morning between 10 and 11 a.m. Patients in the hospital cited sleep disturbance (59.0%), nuisance (38.0%) and interruption in conversation (38.0%) as a consequence of noise. Of these patients, 75.0% said they were just tolerating noise. By the source of noise, patients described talks between patient and family member who sharing the same room, visitors, squeak noise from beds and chairs, trolley, telephone bell and toilet flush.
Conclusion
:Noise in the hospital resulted in sleep disturbance, nuisance and interruption in conversation for patients and poor working environment, reduced performance and interruption in conversation for employees. Noise control seems imminent to make hospital environment comfortable for both patients and employees.

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    Yoonhee Seok, Yoomi Cho, Nayoung Kim, Eunyoung E. Suh
    Nursing Reports.2023; 13(3): 946.     CrossRef
  • Noise Experience Status and Response to Noise of Patients and Nursing Staff in the ICU
    Sun-Hee Yun, Jung-Eun Choi, Hyoung-Soon Kim, Yang-Sook Yoo
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2021; 28(2): 207.     CrossRef
  • Development and Application of an Intervention for Noise Reduction in Intensive Care Units
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    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(6): 584.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between noise awareness, hearing ability, and dental hygiene performance in dental hygienists
    Kyung-Hwa Park, Hyo-Jin Kim
    Journal of Korean society of Dental Hygiene.2015; 15(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Noise Block on Anxiety and Vital Sign of Patients with Gynecologic Laparoscopic Surgery in Operating Room
    Mi Son Choi, Eun Ja Lee
    Korean Journal of Occupational Health Nursing.2012; 21(3): 317.     CrossRef
  • Occupational Diseases of Health Care Workers
    Eun-A Kim
    Hanyang Medical Reviews.2010; 30(4): 265.     CrossRef
The Factors Associated with Job Satisfaction of Assistant Nurses in General Hospitals.
Gwang Jin Kim, Joon Sakong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):296-304.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.296
  • 1,516 View
  • 1 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The main aim of this study was to analyze the factors that could be used to predict job satisfaction of assistant nurses in general hospitals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on a survey of assistant nurses in the Daegu region from January 1, 2006 to January 31, 2006. Originally 300 questionnaires were distributed and among them 291 were completed. The data was collected and used for the statistical analysis. Descriptive and inferential statistics, such as the frequency, t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for the analysis. RESULTS: Among the respondents, the average score for job satisfaction was lowest in the university-trained nurses and highest in the nurses who had only graduated from high school. CONCLUSION: The working conditions, work place and motivation are significantly associated with job satisfaction. In particular, there was lower job satisfaction in those nurses who wanted to change their occupation.

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  • The Clinical Case Report by Acupuncture Treatment for Dizziness after Acoustic Neuroma Surgery
    Yun-Jin Kim, Chee-Fong Teo
    Korean Journal of Acupuncture.2015; 33(1): 33.     CrossRef
  • A Study on Job Satisfaction and Stress in Relation to Job Features of Nursing Assistants - Case Study with Nursing Assistants in Seoul Metropolitan City -
    Kab-Suk Yang, Sung-Je Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2014; 15(5): 2859.     CrossRef
Life Style and Perception of Obesity of Male White Collar Workers.
Ji Hyeon Kim, Joon Sakong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):287-295.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.287
  • 1,610 View
  • 6 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
This study investigated and analyzed the life style of male white-collar workers and their perception of obesity to determine how to improve eating habits and prevent obesity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using the questionnaires distributed to and collected from 300 male white-collar workers in Daegu, the survey was conducted from December 20, 2005 to February 28, 2006. Two hundred sets of collected questionnaires were used for the analysis, and SPSS WIN 12.0 was employed to analyze the data. RESULTS: Forty-two percent of subjects had weights ranging between 71 kg and 80 kg; 39.5%, weighted between 61 kg and 70 kg. The waist measurements of 64.5% of all respondents were between 32 and 34 inches. The lifestyle questions found that 54% of respondents were smokers and 88.5% drank alcohol. In addition, 62.5% of all respondents reported doing exercise, whereas 37.5% reported no exercise. CONCLUSION: The height and weight of 200 respondents were used to calculate the body mass index (BMI). Only 31.6% had a normal BMI, whereas 32% were found to be overweight, a condition likely to lead to obesity. Meanwhile, 36.5% of respondents were obese or morbidly obese.

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    SAGE Open.2021; 11(1): 215824402110041.     CrossRef
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    Western Journal of Nursing Research.2019; 41(5): 728.     CrossRef
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    Preventive Nutrition and Food Science.2011; 16(2): 117.     CrossRef
Introduction of Medical Simulation and the Experience of Computerized Simulation Program Used by MicroSim(R).
Sam Beom Lee, Jae Beum Bang, Joon Sakong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):148-153.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.148
  • 1,478 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Computer- and web-based simulation methods help students develop problem solving and decision making skills. In addition, they provide reality based learning to the student clinical experience with immediate medical feedback as well as repetitive training, on-site reviews and case closure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-five third-year medical students participated in a two-week simulation program. The students selected four modules from eight modules as follows: airway and breathing 1, cardiac arrest 1, cardiac arrhythmia 1, and chest pain 1, and then selected the first case within each of the modules. After 2 weeks, a pass score was obtained and the data analyzed. The average pass score of over 70% was considered a passing grade for each module. If the student did not pass each module, there was no score (i.e., pass score was zero). In addition, when at least one of the four modules was zero, the student was not included in this study. RESULTS: Seventy-five students participated in the simulation program. Nineteen students were excluded based on their performance. The final number of students studied was 56 students (74.7%). The average scores for each module 1 to 4 were 86.7%, 85.3%, 84.0%, and 84.0%, and the average obtained pass score was 88.6 for the four modules in all 56 students. CONCLUSION: Medical simulation enabled students to experience realistic patient situations as part of medical learning. However, it has not been incorporated into traditional educational methodology. Here we describe the introduction and the development of various simulation modules and technologies for medical education.
Health of Apartment Guards and Associated Factors.
Sang Kyu Kim, Joon Sakong, Jong Hak Chung, Chi Ho Kim, Sang Keun Bae, Yun Jin Jang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1999;16(2):357-363.   Published online December 31, 1999
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1999.16.2.357
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this investigation was to study the health status of apartment guards and associated factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This investigation was conducted for 1 month starting from August, 1997. Study population in this cross-sectional survey consisted of 182 guards of apartments located throughout the district of Taegu. Each subject completed a questionnaire about his general characteristics, health behaviors, job descriptions, subjective GIT symptoms and somatization and depression using Symptom Checklist-90-Reversion (SCL-90-R) by self administrated questionnaire and personal interview). RESULTS: Study subjects had one or more GIT symptoms(53.3%), somatization symptoms(83.5%) and depression symptoms(79.7%). The mean scores of GIT, somatization and depression symptoms were not different among the age groups and based on marital status, respectively, but, significantly different by education level(p<0.05). The mean scores of GIT, somatization and depression symptoms were not different among the age groups and hased on marital status, respectively, but, significantly different by regular diet and by the subject's health status(p<0.05). The mean scores of GIT, somatization and depression symptoms were not different by duration of shift work, by job tenure and by the number of managed houses but, those of somatization and depression symptoms were significantly different by level of job satisfaction(p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The health statuses of guards at apartments were different from other shift workers because of health worker effects and characteristics of their jobs.

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  • The effect of long working hours on cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease; A case‐crossover study
    Kyong‐sok Shin, Yun kyung Chung, Young‐Jun Kwon, Jun‐Seok Son, Se‐hoon Lee
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine.2017; 60(9): 753.     CrossRef
  • Effects of sleep quality and occupational stress on health-related quality of life among a university's security workers
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Sick building syndrome in 130 underground workers.
Ree Joo, Joon Sakong, Jong Hak Chung, Sang Whan Park, Dong Hee Kim, Dong Min Kim, Eun Kyong Choi, Hyun Geon Cho
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1998;15(2):325-339.   Published online December 31, 1998
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1998.15.2.325
  • 1,398 View
  • 5 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between sick building syndrome(SBS) and the environmental factors affecting SBS on 130 underground workers and 60 controls. The study consisted of 1) a review of environmental condition 2) measurement of temperature, O2, CO2, CO, and formaldehyde and 3) a questionnaire survey of symptom prevalence and perception of environmental conditions using Indoor Air Quality questionnaire by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Bronchitis and dust allergy were more prevalent in underground workers significantly(p<0.05). Among the 18 symptoms related to the indoor air pollution, the experience rate of dry, itching or irritated eyes, sore or dry throat, chest tightness, tired or strained eyes and dry or itchy skin symptom is significantly different between the underground workers and controls. The diagnostic criteria of SBS was defined as at least one symptom is experienced 1-3 times a week during the last 1 month among 18 indoor air pollution related symptoms which can be relieved by moving out of the underground. Applying the criteria, the mean symptom score was significant higher in underground workers than controls significantly(p<0.05). These results indicated that underground workers are under inappropriate ergonomic and physical condition and inadequate ventilation. Their experience rate of symptoms related to indoor air pollution and prevalence of SBS was significantly higher than controls. To reduce the prevalence of SBS in underground workers, the surveillance system of indoor air quality, restriction of using fuel in underground and legislative regulations for the environment are needed to establish a better indoor air quality. Early detection, treatment and prevention of SBS through medical attention is also needed.

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  • Investigation on the impacts of natural lighting on occupants' wayfinding behavior during emergency evacuation in underground space
    Dachuan Wang, Shuang Liang, Binbin Chen, Cailing Wu
    Energy and Buildings.2022; 255: 111613.     CrossRef
  • Review of the potential health effects of light and environmental exposures in underground workplaces
    Ei Ei Khaing Nang, Gulifeiya Abuduxike, Pawel Posadzki, Ushashree Divakar, Nanthini Visvalingam, Nuraini Nazeha, Gerard Dunleavy, George I. Christopoulos, Chee-Kiong Soh, Krister Jarbrink, Michael Soljak, Josip Car
    Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology.2019; 84: 201.     CrossRef
Neurobehavioral Performance Test of Workers Exposed to Mixed Organic Solvents.
Chang Yoon Kim, Joon Sakong, Jong Hak Chung, Ree Joo, Man Joong Jeon, Nag Jung Sung, Sang Kyu Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1997;14(2):314-328.   Published online December 31, 1997
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1997.14.2.314
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AbstractAbstract PDF
A cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to low-dose solvent on neurobehavioral performance of 48 male workers exposed to organic solvents. A control group of 50 workers was selected from same factories. Each worker completed a medical and occupational questionnaire and four tests of Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery. These included Benton visual retention test, digit symbol, digit span, and pursuit aiming. Comparison of mean performance showed a significantly poorer performance on digit symbol, digit span, and pursuit aiming. In univariate analysis, age contributed to poor performance on Benton visual retention test and educational level was found to reduce the performance on symbol digit in both groups. Amount of alcohol intake was found to reduce the performance on digit symbol and smoking appeared to slow pursuit aiming in the exposure group. In multiple regression analysis, controlling for age, educational level, alcohol, and smoking, solvent exposure was found to be associated with performance of digit span, and number of correct dot of pursuit aiming. Age on Benton visual retention, educational level on digit symbol, and smoking on pursuit aiming were found to be a significant factors on each test items. This study suggest that short-term memory, and perception can be affected easily by chronic exposure of organic solvents which air concentration level were under the Threshold Limit Value.

Citations

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  • An aggravated return-to-work case of organic solvent induced chronic toxic encephalopathy
    Sangyun Seo, Jungwon Kim
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Occupational Psychiatric Disorders in Korea
    Kyeong-Sook Choi, Seong-Kyu Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2010; 25(Suppl): S87.     CrossRef
Effects of Ethanol on Neurobehavioral Performance.
Man Joong Jeon, Joon Sakong, Pock Soo Kang, Moon Chan Kim, Hak Soo Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1997;14(1):183-196.   Published online June 30, 1997
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1997.14.1.183
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AbstractAbstract PDF
An experimental study was performed to investigate. The subjects drank 0.5g/kg ethanol and performed 7 items of SPES(simple reaction time, color word stress, digit classification, finger tapping speed, numerical ability, symbol digit coding, memory digit span). 20 students of medical college participated in the study during August, 1996. After ethanol intake, performance of 4 items(simple reaction time, digit classification, finger tapping speed, symbol digit coding) significantly showed to be decreased. The function of perception - response speed and steady movement were found to be more sensitive to ethanol than that of short - term memory, numerical ability and specification of color. No significant association were found between smoking, alcohol drinking, BMI(body mass index) and the effects of ethanol on neurobehavioral performance.

Citations

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  • Assessment of Availability of Korean Computerized Neurobehavioral Test in Patients with Brain Injury
    Tae-Hoon Kim, Man-Joong Jeon, Joon Sakong
    The Journal of the Korea Contents Association.2013; 13(6): 339.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science