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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Jimi Oh 2 Articles
Impact of Controlling Nutritional Status score on short-term outcomes after carotid endarterectomy: a retrospective cohort study
Hee Won Son, Gyeongseok Yu, Seung Jun Lee, Jimi Oh
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(3):259-267.   Published online October 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00507
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  • 57 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Malnutrition and impaired immune responses significantly affect the clinical outcomes of patients with atherosclerotic stenosis. The Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score has recently been utilized to evaluate perioperative immunonutritional status. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between immunonutritional status, indexed by CONUT score, and postoperative complications in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA).
Methods
We retrospectively evaluated 188 patients who underwent elective CEA between January 2010 and December 2019. The preoperative CONUT score was calculated as the sum of the serum albumin concentration, total cholesterol level, and total lymphocyte count. The primary outcome was postoperative complications within 30 days after CEA, including major adverse cardiovascular events, pulmonary complications, stroke, renal failure, sepsis, wounds, and gastrointestinal complications. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the factors associated with postoperative complications during the 30-day follow-up period.
Results
Twenty-five patients (13.3%) had at least one major complication. The incidence of postoperative complications was identified more frequently in the high CONUT group (12 of 27, 44.4% vs. 13 of 161, 8.1%; p<0.001). Multivariate analyses showed that a high preoperative CONUT score was independently associated with 30-day postoperative complications (hazard ratio, 5.98; 95% confidence interval, 2.56–13.97; p<0.001).
Conclusion
Our results showed that the CONUT score, a simple and readily available parameter using only objective laboratory values, is independently associated with early postoperative complications.
Anesthetic management during whole-lung lavage using lung ultrasound in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case report
Jae Wan Jung, Hyunho Lee, Jimi Oh
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(4):374-380.   Published online September 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01284
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  • 98 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is an uncommon disease characterized by progressive accumulation of lipoprotein material in the lungs due to impaired surfactant clearance. Whole-lung lavage (WLL) is the current standard treatment and consists of sequential lavage of each lung to mechanically remove the residual material from the alveoli. Although WLL is considered safe, unexpected complications can occur. Moreover, due to the rarity of the disease itself, this procedure is unknown to many physicians, and management of intraoperative complications can be challenging for anesthesiologists. Lung ultrasound (LUS) provides reliable and valuable information for detecting perioperative pulmonary complications and, in particular, quantitation of lung water content. There have been reports on monitoring the different stages of controlled deaeration of the non-ventilated lung during WLL using LUS. However, it has been limited to non-ventilated lungs. Therefore, we report the use of LUS in WLL to proactively detect pulmonary edema in the ventilated lung and implement a safe and effective anesthesia strategy. Given the limited diagnostic tools available to anesthesiologists in the operating room, LUS is a reliable, fast, and noninvasive method for identifying perioperative pulmonary complications in patients with PAP undergoing WLL.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science