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Hun Mo Ryoo 6 Articles
POEMS syndrome misdiagnosed as bone metastasis in a patient with thyroid cancer.
Sang Ah Baek, Hun Mo Ryoo, Sung Hwa Bae, Yoon Young Cho, Seong gyu Kim, Ga Young Kim, Min Keun Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2015;32(2):122-126.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2015.32.2.122
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a monoclonal plasma cell disorder. Patients with POEMS syndrome also have various clinical manifestations including generalized edema, pleural effusion, ascites, papilledema, and sclerotic bone lesions. These manifestations can lead to a misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. We recently experienced a 51-year-old male patient with POEMS syndrome whose sclerotic bone lesion was misdiagnosed as malignant bone metastasis of papillary thyroid carcinoma. We reassessed the patient and found polyneuropathy, hepatosplenomegaly, hypothyroidism, partial hypopituitarism, immunoglobulin G lambda-type monoclonal gammopathy, hypertrichosis, ascites, and multiple sclerotic bone lesions, all of which led us to a diagnosis of POEMS syndrome. Treatment with thalidomide and dexamethasone resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. The patient has remained in remission after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.
Relapsed plasmacytoma in central nervous system after complete remission of extramedullary plasmacytoma.
Sun Mi Kang, Seong Gyu Kim, Ji Ho Seo, Ji Yoon Kim, Woo Jung Sung, Sung Hwa Bae, Hun Mo Ryoo
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2014;31(1):43-47.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2014.31.1.43
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) is a rare disease that occurs in 3% to 5% of patients with plasma cell disorder. It occurs most commonly in the upper respiratory tract and the oral cavity. Very few EMP cases have been reported in the central nervous system (CNS). We report herein an unusual case of EMP in the nasal cavity that recurred in the CNS without systemic involvement. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to a month-long bout with exophthalmos. He was diagnosed with EMP in the nasal cavity, paranasal sinus, and orbital cavity. He received radiotherapy to which he had complete responses. After 2 years, he visited our hospital because of a month-long headache. He was diagnosed with EMP recurrence in the CNS via brain magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. He was treated with whole brain radiotherapy and intrathecal chemotherapy with methotrexate, but he expired due to pneumonia.
A Case of Essential Thrombocythemia Presenting as Esophageal Varix Bleeding and Multiple Thrombosis.
So Yeon Yoon, Jun Hyeok Choi, Sun Mi Kang, Jung Nam Cho, Sung Hwa Bae, Hun Mo Ryoo
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2011;28(1):99-104.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2011.28.1.99
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Essential thrombocythemia (ET), a subcategory of chronic myeloproliferative disorder, is characterized by absolute thrombocytosis due to excessive clonal proliferation of platelets, hyperaggregability of platelets, and increased incidence of thrombosis and hemorrhage. We consider a diagnosis of ET when an unexplained and persistent thrombocytosis is observed. It is difficult to consider ET first when we meet a patient with esophageal varix bleeding or unusual multiple thromboses like mesenteric vein, splenic vein, and portal vein. This article reports a patient who presented initially with esophageal varix bleeding and unusual multiple thromboses, thereafter, she was diagnosed with ET after testing positive for the Janus Tyrosine Kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F mutation. In conclusion, in patients with varix bleeding and unusual multiple thromboses, myeloproliferative disorders like essential thrombocythemia should be considered as a potential cause and testing for the JAK2 mutation is warranted.
Early or Late Gefitinib, Which is Better for Survival?: Retrospective Analysis of 228 Korean Patients with Advanced or Metastatic NSCLC.
Dong Gun Kim, Min Kyoung Kim, Sung Hwa Bae, Sung Ae Koh, Sung Woo Park, Hyun Je Kim, Myung Jin Kim, Hyo Jin Jang, Kyung Hee Lee, Kwan Ho Lee, Jin Hong Chung, Kyung Chul Shin, Hun Mo Ryoo, Myung Soo Hyun
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2011;28(1):31-44.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2011.28.1.31
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The optimal timing of treatment with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI) in NSCLC patients has not yet been determined. METHODS: We separated 228 patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC treated with gefitinib into an early gefitinib group (patients who received gefitinib as first- or second-line treatment) and a delayed gefitinib group (patients who received gefitinib as third or fourth-line treatment) and attempted to determine whether the timing of gefitinib treatment affected clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Median overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and median OS from first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic disease (OSt) for 111 patients in the early gefitinib group were 6.2 months, 3.3 months, and 11.6 months. However, median OS, PFS, and OSt for 84 patients in the delayed gefitinib group were 7.8 months, 2.3 months, and 22.7 months. No differences in OS and PFS were observed between the 2 groups. However, OSt was significantly longer in the delayed gefitnib group. Timing of gefitinib therapy was one of the independent predictors of OSt. Hb > or = 10 g/dl, and having never smoked, and ECOG performance status < or =1 were independent predictors of better PFS. CONCLUSION: Deferral of gefitinib therapy in patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC may be preferable if they are able to tolerate chemotherapy.
Comparative Study on the Infection Rates of Protected Environment versus Non-Protected Environment in Acute Myeloid Leukemia during Remission Induction Chemotherapy.
Se Hoon Sohn, Ha young Lee, Dong Geun Kim, Sung Woo Park, Myung Jin Kim, Myung Jin Oh, Hye Deok Woo, Hun Mo Ryoo, Sung Hwa Bae, Kyung Hee Lee, Min Kyoung Kim, Myung Soo Hyun
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2010;27(2):113-121.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2010.27.2.113
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
AND PURPOSE: Patients with acute leukemia experience prolonged periods of neutropenia due to their disease or its treatment. For this reason, they often develop serious infectious complications. Although antibiotic therapy has improved in recent years, the fatality rate from infection remains high. For the control of infection, protected environment was developed. But because of economic issue, most of chemotherapy with acute myeloid leukemia have conducted in non-protected environment. So this study compared the rate of complete remission, days with neutropenia, rate of fever, rate of positive culture, rate of overt infection and use of antibacterial and antifungal agents with patients within non-protected environment and protected environment, retrospectively. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia during first remission induction chemotherapy were eligible for this study. METHODS: Retrospective analysis was conducted between patients in non-protected (25 patients) and protected environment (14 patients) with acute myeloid leukemia during remission induction chemotherapy. RESULTS: Rate of overt infection, rate of fever, rate of positive culture and rate of use of antibiotics were significantly high in patients within non-protected environment compared with patients within protected environment. There were no differences in rate of complete remission and days of neutropenia. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests protected environment for patients with acute myeloid leukemia during remission induction chemotherapy could reduce rate of overt infection, and rate of use of antibiotics.
A Case of Idiopathic Hypereosinophihc Syndrome Assoclated with Pulmonary Infiltration.
Hun Mo Ryoo, Young Soo Kweon, Jin Hong Chung, Kwan Ho Lee, Hyun Woo Lee, Dong Sug Kim, Sam Beom Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1994;11(2):375-380.   Published online December 31, 1994
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1994.11.2.375
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome consists of peripheral blood eosinophilia of 1500/mm3 or more without a known cause, plus signs and symptoms of organ eosinophilia. The prognosis of HES without treatment is poor. However, about one third of the patients with this syndrome may respond to corticosteroid thrapy. Morever, the majority of the remainder may have a favorable response to hydroxyurea. We present here a case of hypereosinophilic syndrome without any identifiable causes, involving bone marrow, liver, lungs and cervical lymph node. We tried corticosteroid as a treatment but it showed no response. However the hydroxyurea showed good response.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science