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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Deok Hee Lee 10 Articles
Adjuvant medications to local anesthetics in nerve blockade
Deok Hee Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2017;34(2):161-168.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2017.34.2.161
  • 1,991 View
  • 19 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Peripheral nerve blocks are commonly used for surgical anesthesia, postoperative analgesia, and to reduce opioid requirements. Although these blocks have traditionally been carried out using local anesthetics, single-injection techniques can be short-lived and limited by the relatively brief duration of action of currently available local anesthetics. Increasing the dose or concentration of local anesthetics may prolong the duration of analgesia, but may also increase the risk such as unwanted motor weakness or systemic toxicity of local anesthetics. Numerous adjuvant medications have been added to local anesthetics to prolong the durations of anesthesia and analgesia achieved by peripheral nerve blocks, and currently, a number of different adjuvants are used to improve quality of the block. This article will review the several nerve block adjuvants used in combination with local anesthetics to provide blockade of peripheral nerves in clinical practice, describing the rationale for their use in peripheral nerve blocks, and the evidence for their effectiveness.
A comparison of 0.075% and 0.15% of ropivacaine with fentanyl for postoperative patient controlled epidural analgesia after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery
Hyun Chul Jung, Hyo Jung Seo, Deok Hee Lee, Sang Jin Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2017;34(1):37-42.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2017.34.1.37
  • 2,070 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
A motor blockade of lower limbs interferes with early ambulation and limits the usefulness of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). The concentration of local anesthetic solution is a major determinant for motor block with PCEA. We compared the effects of epidural infusion of 0.075% ropivacaine with 0.15% epidural ropivacaine on postoperative analgesia, motor block of lower limbs, and other side effects. METHODS: A total of 70 patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery received epidural infusions (group R1, 0.15% ropivacaine with fentanyl; group R2, 0.075% ropivacaine with fentanyl). Pain score, motor block, and side effects (hypotension, nausea, vomiting, pruritus, urinary retention, dizziness, and numbness) were measured. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the demographic profiles between the groups. Pain scores of the group R1 and the group R2 were not significantly different. Motor block was more frequent in the group R1 (0.15% ropivacaine with fentanyl) than in the group R2 (0.075% ropivacaine with fentanyl). CONCLUSION: Lower concentration of ropivacaine (0.075%), when compared with higher concentration of ropivacaine (0.15%), seemed to provide similar analgesia with less motor blockade of the lower limbs for the purpose of PCEA.
Hemothorax after Central Venous Catherization Failure through the Subclavian Vein.
Dae Young Kim, Dae Woo Kim, Hee Won Son, Sang Jin Park, Deok Hee Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2008;25(2):175-181.   Published online December 31, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2008.25.2.175
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Central venous catheterization via an internal jugular vein or subclavian vein has become a common procedure in monitoring CVP and managing severely ill patients. However, there have beennumerous reports of complications associated with central venous catheterization. These include vessel injury, pneumothorax, hemothorax, nerve injury, arrhythmias, arteriovenous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and infection at the insertion site. We report a case of hemothorax after subclavian vein catheterization failure, along with successful treatment.
General Anesthesia for Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsyin Child with Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.
Sang Jin Park, Il chi Kwon, Won Ki Lee, Deok Hee Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2008;25(1):78-83.   Published online June 30, 2008
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2008.25.1.78
  • 1,489 View
  • 6 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is an inborn error of purine metabolism resulting from hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) deficiency and leading to excess purine production and uric acid over-production. It is a very rare X-linked recessive disorder, characterized by movement disorder, cognitive deficits, and self-injurious behavior. However, because of the high incidence of calculi, patients may present for surgery of urinary tract, and have increased risk of difficult intubation, aspiration pneumonia, renal insufficiency or sudden death. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome who underwent successive extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy under general anesthesia.
Treatment of Atelectasis Dectected in the Recovery Room after General Anesthesia
Chang jae Hwang, Heung dae Kim, Dae pal Park, Il suk Seo, Sun ok Song, Sae yeon Kim, Dae lim Jee, Deok hee Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2 Suppl):S696-701.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2S.S696
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Atelectasis is a relatively common complication following surgery in anesthetized patient with respiratory symptoms, but rarely occur in normal healthy patient. Anesthesiologists must be wary to prevent atelectasis, because it may lead to hypoxia during and after the operation. This case reports a healthy patient without previous respiratory symptoms who developed left lower lobar atelectasis after general anesthesia. Vigorous chest physiotherapy including intended coughing, deep breathing, chest percussion and vibration under postural change was effective. Therefore, vigorous chest physiotherapy is essential part of early treatment modalities for atelectasis in postoperative recovery room.
Subcutaneous Emphysema and Inflammation of the Neck after Tracheal Puncture by an Intubating Stylet.
Gul Jung, Woo Mok Byun, Hyung Jun Lim, Jong Gyun Kim, Dong Min Kwak, Deok Hee Lee, Sae Yeon Kim, Sun Ok Song, Il Sook Seo, Dae Lim Jee, Heung Dae Kim, Dae Pal Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):344-344.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.344
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  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Laryngo-tracheal perforation caused by the use of a stylet during tracheal intubation is a rare complication. We present a case of subcutaneous emphysema and connective tissue inflammation after tracheal intubation. The patient was a 41-year-old male undergoing general anesthesia for an appendectomy. The intubation was difficult during laryngoscopy (Cormack-Lehane Grade III). An assistant provided an endotracheal tube with a stylet inside while the laryngoscope was in place. During intubation, a short, dull sound was heard with a sudden loss of resistance after the distal tip of the endotracheal tube passed the rima glottis. A sonogram and computerized tomography revealed subcutaneous emphysema from the neck to the upper mediastinum and fluid collection between the trachea and the thyroid. This lesion appeared to have been caused by the protruded, loose stylet. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the damage a loose stylet protruding beyond the tip of the endotracheal tube can cause.
The Effect of Anticholinergic Agents on Postoperative Sore Throat in Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.
Joo Young Lee, Deok Hee Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):305-310.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.305
  • 1,644 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
After sinus surgery, airway dryness is made worse because patients breathe by mouth. Anticholinergic agents have antisialogogue effects. The airway dryness that occurs after surgery is severe and can increase the incidence of postoperative sore throat. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One-hundered patients who were scheduled for endoscopic sinus surgery(ESS) were divided into four groups. Each group was premedicated with glycopyrrolate or had no premedication and reversed with glycopyrrolate or atropine. After the surgery the patients were asked about a sore throat and hoarseness postoperatively after 1h, 6h, 12h, 24h, and 48hours, respectively. RESULTS: The incidence of postoperative sore throat and hoarseness was not significantly different among the four groups at any time. CONCLUSION: The severity of complications after ESS was low and subsided within 24 hours. Therefore, the use of anticholinergic agents does not need to be limited.
The Effects of Preoperative Sprayed 10% Lidocaine on the Hemodynamic Response during Suspension Microlaryngeal Surgery.
Deok Hee Lee, Hyun Seok Do
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):162-169.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.162
  • 1,658 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE: It is well known that suspension microlaryngeal surgery produces marked increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate. In this study, we evaluated the effects of 10% lidocaine preoperatively sprayed for attenuation of the perioperative hemodynamic response during suspension microlaryngeal surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class 1 patients scheduled for excision of a vocal polyp by suspension laryngoscopy were randomly divided into two groups (n=25 for each group). They were intubated without 10% lidocaine spray (control group) or given 1.5 mg/kg of 10% lidocaine sprayed onto the pharyngolaryngeal and intratracheal sites 90 sec prior to intubation (10% lidocaine group). Anesthesia was maintained using desflurane in O2/N2O 50%. The arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured at preinduction (T0), 1 min (T1), 3 min (T2), 5 min (T3) after tracheal intubation, and 1 min (T4), 3 min (T5), 5 min (T6) and 10 min (T7) after the suspension laryngoscopy. RESULTS: In the 10% lidocaine group, the arterial blood pressure and heart rate at 1 (T1), 3 (T2) min after tracheal intubation and 1 (T4), and 3 (T5) min after suspension laryngoscopy were lower than the same measurements in the control group. CONCLUSION: 10% lidocaine sprayed onto the pharyngolaryngeal and intratracheal sites before intubation was an effective method for attenuation of the perioperative hemodynamic response during suspension microlaryngeal surgery.
The Clinical Effectiveness of the Bonfils Intubation Fibrescope in Difficult Tracheal Intubation.
Deok Hee Lee, Il Chi Kwon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):154-161.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.154
  • 1,644 View
  • 7 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of the Bonfils intubation fibrescope for cases of difficult tracheal intubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For patients with an ASA physical status 1 or 2 betwen the ages of 20-90, direct laryngoscopy was performed and the layngoscopic view graded according to the Cormack and Lehane classification. Forty patients with Cormack and Lehane grade 3 or 4 were intubated using the Bonfils intubation fibrescope. During intubation, the success rates for tracheal intubation, overall time to intubation, number of attempts and adverse effects were recorded. The Thyromental and sternomental distances were recorded after the orotracheal intubation. RESULTS: The success rates were significantly higher in Cormack and Lehane grade 3 (96.9%) patients compared to grade 4 (50%) (P<0.01). The time to intubation was significantly faster in patients with grade 3 compared to grade 4 (20 (10-49[7-300]) sec vs. 180 (31-300[10-300]) sec, P=0.01). The number of cases with a SpO2<90% was significantly lower in patients with grade 3 (3.1%) compared to grade 4 (50%) (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: In patients with Cormack and Lehane grade 3, tracheal intubation using the Bonfils intubation fibrescope appears to be an effective technique for the management of a difficult intubation. However, the Bonfils intubation fibrescope can not always be used for the management of a difficult intubation in grade 4 patients; for these patients other effective instruments should be considered for difficult intubations.
Aspiration Pneumonia after General Anesthesia Using Laryngeal Mask Airway: A case report.
Deok Hee Lee, Ki Ho Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2004;21(1):127-131.   Published online June 30, 2004
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2004.21.1.127
  • 1,667 View
  • 9 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has many advantages in the management of airway emergencies or the treatment of patients in whom intubation is difficult, but the use of LMA during positive ventilation may seem inappropriate to protect the airway because of the risk of pulmonary aspiration of regurgitated gastric contents. We experienced aspiration pneumonia after general anesthesia using LMA in patient who suffered from panperitonitis. It is considered that the main reason for aspiration pneumonia was a leakage of gastric content through the space surrounding the nasogastric tube while under high airway inflation pressure. We concluded that when LMA or the Proseal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA) is chosen for the use in difficult intubations, careful patient-suitability selection and the correct knowledge of LMA and PLMA are needed to protect the airway against aspiration.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science