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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Dai Seg Bai 4 Articles
Yeungnam University type drive-through (YU-Thru) coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) screening system: a rapid and safe screening system
Wan Seok Seo, Seong Ho Kim, Si Youn Song, Jian Hur, Jun Lee, Sunho Choi, Yoojung Lee, Dai Seg Bai
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):349-355.   Published online September 18, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00640
  • 9,811 View
  • 99 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Active and prompt scale-up screening tests are essential to efficiently control the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. The goal of this work was to identify shortcomings in the conventional screening system (CSS) implemented in the beginning of the outbreak. To overcome these shortcomings, we then introduced a novel, independently developed system called the Yeungnam University type drive-through (YU-Thru), and distributed it nationwide in Korea. This system is similar to the drive-throughs utilized by fast food restaurants. YU-Thru system has shortened the time taken to test a single person to 2–4 minutes, by completely eliminating the time required to clean and ventilate the specimen collection room. This time requirement was a major drawback of the CSS. YU-Thru system also reduced the risk of subjects and medical staff infecting one another by using a separate and closed examination system. On average, 50 to 60 tests were conducted per day when using the CSS, while now up to 350 tests per day are conducted with the YU-Thru system. We believe that the YU-Thru system has made an important contribution to the rapid detection of COVID-19 in Daegu, South Korea. Here, we will describe the YU-Thru system in detail so that other countries experiencing COVID-19 outbreaks can take advantage of this system.

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  • Experience of operating a medical humanities course at one medical school during the COVID-19: a retrospective study
    Yu Ra Kim, Hye-won Shin, Young Hwan Lee, Seong-Yong Kim
    Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science.2023; 40(2): 179.     CrossRef
  • Lessons Learned From an Analysis of the Emergency Medical Services’ COVID-19 Drive-Through Testing Facilities in Israel
    Itay Zmora, Evan Avraham Alpert, Uri Shacham, Nisim Mishraki, Eli Jaffe
    Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness.2022; 16(5): 2091.     CrossRef
  • A study on the mental health of students at a medical school during COVID-19 outbreak: a retrospective study
    Yu Ra Kim, Hye Jin Park, Bon-Hoon Koo, Ji Young Hwang, Young Hwan Lee
    Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science.2022; 39(4): 314.     CrossRef
Manifestation of Cognitive Function in Geriatric Patient with Subjective Memory Complaint.
Han Kyul Park, Jin Sung Kim, Jong Bum Lee, Wan Seok Seo, Bon Hoon Koo, Dai Seg Bai
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2010;27(1):27-36.   Published online June 30, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2010.27.1.27
  • 1,785 View
  • 5 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to find out cognitive function of the patients with subjective memory complaint. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From March 1st 2005 to May 31st 2009, 155 normal individuals without any medical illness who visited Yeungnam University Hospital to undergo medical checkup with neurocognitive test was enrolled, and checked by using Cognitive Assessment & Reference Diagnostic System. RESULTS: 107 of the patients had normal cognitive function, 21 patients (about 15%) were diagnosed with dementia, and 10 patients (about 7%) were diagnosed with considerable psychiatric illness, such as depression, anxiety disorder, adjustment disorder. CONCLUSION: Because the patients with subjective memory complaint can be diagnosed as any psychiatric illness as well as dementia, sensitive screening test and early psychiatric approach is needed.

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  • Effects of a Cognition Activation Program for the Institutionalized Old-Old in Korea
    Hung Sa Lee, Dohyun Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2013; 24(4): 427.     CrossRef
The Relationship of Spiritual Well-being and Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Active Old Age.
Hyong Uk Youm, Seung Deuk Cheung, Wan Seok Seo, Bon Hoon Koo, Dai Seg Bai
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2005;22(1):27-42.   Published online June 30, 2005
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2005.22.1.27
  • 1,747 View
  • 12 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
This study assessed the mental health, in order to determine the effect of the subject's spiritual well-being on anxiety depression and quality of life in active old people, and to verify whether or not spiritual well-being is a new factor for comprehensive health in old people. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study selected 184 old people aged over 65 years. The subject's spiritual well-being was assessed by the Korean Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWS) that was composed of the Religious Well-being Scale (RWS) and Existential Well-being Scale (EWS). The quality of life was assessed using Quality of Life Scale, which was composed of the subjective feeling about life and the subject's satisfaction of their whole life. RESULTS: Among the psychosocial factors, the educational level and physical health, showed significant discriminative score in the SWS. A prior medical history was associated with a significantly low SWS score. Satisfaction with life was associated with a significantly high SWS score. These factors a showed significant discriminative EWS score rather than a RWS. Among the religion factors, the satisfaction with their religion showed significant difference in the SWS. The SWS score especially the EWS affected the anxiety and depression of the Korean Combined Anxiety and Depression Scale (CADS). The subjective feeling of life score was associated with a significantly EWS low score and the subject's satisfaction with their whole life score was associated with a significantly high EWS score. CONCLUSION: Spiritual well being has significantly effects on anxiety depression and the quality of life in active old age people, and the subject; s spiritual well-being might be a new factor for assessing health in old age.

Citations

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  • Cultural involvement and attitudes toward tourism: Examining serial mediation effects of residents’ spiritual wellbeing and place attachment
    Jieyi Li, Li Pan, Yaou Hu
    Journal of Destination Marketing & Management.2021; 20: 100601.     CrossRef
  • The Mediating Effect of Spirituality between Nurses' Empathy and Elderly Care Performance in the Long Term Care Hospitals
    Heeok Park, Eun Kyung Kim, Kyoung Ja Moon, Min Ji Kim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(1): 34.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Death Education Program on Self-Esteem, Spiritual Well-Being, and Pain of Adults
    Bock-Ryun Kim, Chung-uk Oh, Hye-kyung Kang
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2016; 17(9): 156.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Suicidal Ideation in Male Baby Boomers
    Hee Sook Kim, Kwang Za Yu, Gyeong Ran Park
    Journal of Korean Public Health Nursing.2014; 28(2): 347.     CrossRef
  • Spiritual Well-Being, Social Support, Life Satisfaction and Depression in the Community Dwelling Elderly
    So Nam Kim, Sang Bok Lee
    journal of east-west nursing research.2013; 19(2): 186.     CrossRef
The Effect of Spiritual Well-being on the Mental Health of the Cho-Sun Tribal Women Residing in P.R. of China.
Seung Deuk Cheung, Jong Bum Lee, Jin Sung Kim, Wan Seok Seo, Dai Seg Bai, Soon Jae Park, Yeol Joo, Hyoung Uk Youm, Cheung Yuan Jin, Jiu Miao Jin, Yeung Log Ahn, Da Hong Huang, Mei Zi Biao, Tai Ji Zheng, Chang Lie Zhao
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2004;21(2):151-166.   Published online December 31, 2004
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2004.21.2.151
  • 1,798 View
  • 2 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Spirituality has been an important part of Transpersonal Psychology and is believed to have a large effect on the mental health because it has been systematized. The aim of this study was to determine the level of spiritual disposition on human beings along with its effects on one's mental health. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study targeted 400 women residing in Youn-Gil city of JiLin Prov., which is a district of the Cho-Sun tribe in China. Their spiritual well-being was studied using the Spiritual Well-being Scale-Korean Version. The spiritual well-being scale consists of 2 sub-scales of religious well-being and existential well-being. The study was evaluated using a lie scale, psychotic trend, and a combined anxiety-depression scale. The results were considered to be factors of one's mental health. The correlation between the spiritual well-being and each tendency was analyzed by regression analysis. RESULTS: The total score of the Cho-Sun tribal women according to the spiritual well-being scale was 68.29 which was much less than the 100.65 of Korean Christian women. There was no significant correlation between the spiritual well-being and the Lie trend. However, it was found that 86% (344) of Cho-Sun tribal women scored above 70 in the Lie trend with a mean score of 74.57 which is higher than normal populations. Regarding the correlation between the spiritual well-being and psychotic trend, the psychotic trend became significantly higher when the religious well-being was at a high level. On the other hand, the psychotic trend became significantly lower when the existential well-being was at a high level. Regarding the correlation between the spiritual well-being and anxiety, the anxiety was significantly higher when the religious well-being was at a high level. However, the anxiety level was significantly low when the existential well-being was at a high level. Regarding the correlation between the spiritual well-being and depression, the depression level was somewhat significantly high when the religious well-being was at a high level. However, the depression level was significantly low when the existential well-being was at a high level. CONCLUSION: This study evaluated the effects of spiritual well-being on a person's mental health among Cho-Sun tribal women in Youn-Gil city of JiLIn Prov., P.R. of China. The results found that the religious well-being, which is a sub-scale of spiritual well-being, had negative effects while the existential well-being had positive effects on the mental health. These results proved that a person's religious disposition had negative effects on their mental health in a communitarian society.

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  • Spiritual Health in Korean Culture -Q methodological approach-
    Hyung Wha Shim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2015; 22(2): 129.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science