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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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3 "Pulmonary Artery"
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Pulmonary artery sarcoma manifesting as a main pulmonary artery stenosis diagnosed by 18F-FDG PET/CT
Hoonhee Lee, Han Bit Park, Yun Kyung Cho, Jung Min Ahn, Sang Min Lee, Jae Seung Lee, Dae Hee Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2017;34(2):279-284.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2017.34.2.279
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and fatal disease that often mimics chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH); therefore, diagnosis of PAS is often delayed. Herein, a healthy 74-year-old man was presented with a 4-month history of dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed wall thickening and stenosis in the main pulmonary artery as well as in both proximal pulmonary arteries. In order to differentiate between unusual CTEPH, vasculitis, and PAS, we performed right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure was 21 mmHg, and there was severe pulmonary artery stenosis. Thrombi on the pulmonary arterial wall lesions were observed in intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography. Furthermore, the patient had a history of deep vein thrombosis. Therefore, we diagnosed unusual CTEPH. After 6 months of rivaroxaban anticoagulation therapy, a chest X-ray revealed a left lower lobe lung mass, and a positron emission tomography later showed hypermetabolic lesions in the main pulmonary artery wall, in both pulmonary arteries walls, in the lung parenchyma, and in the bones. A biopsy of the right proximal humerus lesion revealed undifferentiated intimal sarcoma. Pulmonary sarcoma is rare, but should be considered when differentially diagnosing main pulmonary artery wall thickening and stenosis. A positron emission tomography may aid in this diagnosis.
An adult asymptomatic pulmonary artery sling.
Han Hee Chung, Ju Yeol Baek, Won Yik Lee, Ji Hye Jang, Min Young Jeong, Gi Hyeon Woo, Seong Il Park, Il Kyu Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2014;31(2):109-112.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2014.31.2.109
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A pulmonary artery sling is a very rare congenital abnormality in which the left pulmonary artery rises from the posterior surface of the right pulmonary artery and then passes between the trachea and the esophagus, causing tracheal compression. It is associated with tracheo-bronchial abnormalities (50%) and cardiovascular abnormalities (30%). It may produce respiratory symptoms through the airway compression of the abnormal left pulmonary artery and congenital abnormalities associated with it. Because most (90%) pulmonary artery sling patients present symptoms during infancy, their condition is often diagnosed in the first year of life. However, a pulmonary artery sling is occasionally found in adults. It is usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. This is a very rare case of an asymptomatic pulmonary artery sling in an adult. A 38-year-old man presented symptoms of mild exertional dyspnea. His spiral computed tomography showed a pulmonary artery sling. He was discharged without specific treatment because his symptoms improved without specific treatment and might not have been associated with a pulmonary artery sling. We report an adult case of an asymptomatic pulmonary artery sling diagnosed via spiral computed tomography, accompanied by a literature review.
A Case of Unilateral Absence of Left Pulmonary Artery Presenting Hemoptysis.
Hye Jin Yoon, Tae Mook No, Seon Woong Kim, Dong Hi Park, In Seek Kim, Yeon Jae Kim, Byung Ki Lee, Ji Young Park, Jin Hong Chung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2003;20(1):71-78.   Published online June 30, 2003
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2003.20.1.71
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Unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare congenital anomaly that is frequently associated with other cardiovascular anomalies first reported by Fraentzel in 1968. Most patients who have no associated cardiac anomalies have only minor or absent symptoms. We experienced a case of isolated UAPA in a young female presenting hemoptysis. The chest radiograph showed a small left lung volume and high resolutional CT of chest showed multiple subpleural nodules and centrilobular nodules in parenchyma. The video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy revealed diffuse dilated vessels in visceral pleura. The pulmonary angiogram confirmed the absence of the left main pulmonary artery.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science