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Case report
Intraabdominal abscess mimicking gastric cancer recurrence: a case report
Yong-Eun Park
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):426-429.   Published online February 1, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00864
  • 1,846 View
  • 37 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Surgical site infection is a common healthcare-associated infection that rarely occurs several months after surgery. Herein, a case is described in which an abdominal mass lesion was found at a 6-month follow-up visit after gastrectomy was performed for early gastric cancer. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed a 2.5 cm-sized mass with a high maximal standard uptake value (8.32), located above a previous anastomosis site. Locoregional recurrence of gastric cancer was diagnosed by multidisciplinary team discussion, and explorative laparotomy was performed. However, surgical and pathologic findings revealed that the mass was an intraabdominal abscess. In conclusion, differential diagnosis of delayed abscess formation should be considered if the possibility of tumor recurrence is low, especially after early gastric cancer surgery.
Original article
Infection prevention measures and outcomes for surgical patients during a COVID-19 outbreak in a tertiary hospital in Daegu, South Korea: a retrospective observational study
Kyung-Hwa Kwak, Jay Kyoung Kim, Ki Tae Kwon, Jinseok Yeo
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(3):223-229.   Published online November 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01431
  • 5,240 View
  • 95 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The first large coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak outside China occurred in Daegu. In response, we developed infection prevention measures for surgical patients during the outbreak at our hospital and retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of COVID-19–related surgical patients.
Methods
We reviewed the medical records of 118 COVID-19–related surgical patients and monitored their clinical outcomes until March 31, 2021. We also interviewed healthcare workers who participated in their perioperative care at Kyungpook National University Chilgok Hospital. The perioperative management guidelines for COVID-19–related patients were prepared through multidisciplinary discussions, including the infection control department, surgical departments, and anesthesiology department before and during the COVID-19 outbreak.
Results
One standard operating room was temporarily converted to a negative-pressure room by increasing the exhaust air volume, creating a relative pressure of −11.3 Pa. The healthcare workers were equipped with personal protective equipment according to the patient's classification of the risk of COVID-19 transmission. The 118 COVID-19–related patients underwent emergent surgery in the negative-pressure room, including three COVID-19–confirmed patients and five COVID-19–exposed patients.
Conclusion
All surgeries of the COVID-19–related patients were performed without specific adverse events or perioperative COVID-19 transmission. Our experience setting up a negative-pressure operating room and conservative perioperative protocol to prevent COVID-19 transmission will help plan and execute infection control measures in the future.
Case report
Coinfection of Sphingomonas paucimobilis meningitis and Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia in an immunocompetent patient: a case report
Sang Woon Bae, Jong Ho Lee
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2022;39(1):67-71.   Published online June 7, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.01074
  • 4,861 View
  • 91 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This report describes a case of coinfection of Sphingomonas paucimobilis meningitis and Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia in a 66-year-old immunocompetent female patient. The patient had undergone traditional procedures, including acupuncture, which possibly caused the coinfection. During treatment with susceptible antibiotics for bacterial meningitis, she developed hydrocephalus on the third day. Consequently, the patient recovered with a mild neurological deficit of grade 4 motor assessment in both upper and lower extremities at discharge. S. paucimobilis and L. monocytogenes are rare pathogens in developed countries, occurring only during environmental outbreaks. S. paucimobilis meningitis is rarely reported. Hence, the various presentations of S. paucimobilis meningitis and the antibiotic regimen for its treatment are hereby reported, in addition to a review of other similar reported cases. This case is a possible traditional procedure-related infection. Appropriate oversight and training should be emphasized regarding preventive measures of this kind of infection. A team approach with neurologists and neurosurgeons is imperative in treating patients with hydrocephalus-complicated meningitis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Concurrent Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Meningitis in an Immunocompromised Patient: A Rare Case Report and Comprehensive Review of Literature
    Iosif Marincu, Felix Bratosin, Iulia Bogdan, Catalin Dumitru, Carmen Nicoleta Stoica, Andrei Nicolae Csep, Narcisa Mederle, Roxana Manuela Fericean, Alexandru Ovidiu Mederle, Reshmanth Prathipati, Gratiana Nicoleta Chicin, Adelina Mavrea, Paula Irina Bara
    Medicina.2023; 59(4): 687.     CrossRef
  • Publication status and reporting quality of case reports on acupuncture-related adverse events: A systematic reviews of case studies
    Tae-Hun Kim, Myeong Soo Lee, Stephen Birch, Terje Alræk, Arne Johan Norheim, Jung Won Kang
    Heliyon.2023; 9(10): e20577.     CrossRef
Original article
Significance of albumin to globulin ratio as a predictor of febrile urinary tract infection after ureteroscopic lithotripsy
Seung Yun Yi, Dong Jin Park, Kyungchan Min, Jae-Wook Chung, Yun-Sok Ha, Bum Soo Kim, Hyun Tae Kim, Tae-Hwan Kim, Eun Sang Yoo
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(3):225-230.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2021.00955
  • 4,492 View
  • 62 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
We aimed to analyze the effectiveness of albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) in predicting postoperative febrile urinary tract infection (fUTI) after ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URS) and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS).
Methods
From January 2013 to May 2018, 332 patients underwent URS and RIRS. The rate of postoperative fUTI and risk factors for postoperative fUTI were analyzed using logistic regression. Patients were divided into postoperative fUTI and non-postoperative fUTI (non-fUTI) groups. AGR with other demographic and perioperative data were compared between the two groups to predict the development of fUTI after URS.
Results
Of the 332 patients, postoperative fUTI occurred in 41 (12.3%). Preoperative pyuria, microscopic hematuria, diabetes mellitus, hypoalbuminemia, and hyperglobulinemia were more prevalent in the fUTI group. Patients in the fUTI group had larger stone size, lower preoperative AGR, longer operation time, and longer preoperative antibiotic coverage period. In a multivariable logistic analysis, preoperative pyuria, AGR, and stone size were independently correlated with postoperative fUTI (p<0.001, p=0.008, and p=0.041, respectively). Receiver operating curve analysis showed that the cutoff value of AGR that could predict a high risk of fUTI after URS was 1.437 (sensitivity, 77.3%; specificity, 76.9%), while the cutoff value of stone size was 8.5 mm (sensitivity, 55.3%; specificity, 44.7%).
Conclusion
This study demonstrated that preoperative pyuria, AGR, and stone size can serve as prognostic factors for predicting fUTI after URS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Common hematological and biochemical parameters for predicting urinary tract infections in geriatric patients with hip fractures
    Wanyun Tang, Wei Yao, Wei Wang, Qiaomei Lv, Wenbo Ding, RenJian He
    Frontiers in Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An analysis of bacteriuria rates after endourological procedures
    Nethravathy Billava Seenappa, Maneesh Sinha, Thyagaraj Krishna Prasad, Venkatesh Krishnamoorthy
    International Journal of Urological Nursing.2023; 17(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • Nutritional and Inflammatory Indices and the Risk of Surgical Site Infection After Fragility Hip Fractures: Can Routine Blood Test Point to Patients at Risk?
    Tal Frenkel Rutenberg, Rana Gabarin, Vitali Kilimnik, Efrat Daglan, Moti Iflah, Shani Zach, Shai Shemesh
    Surgical Infections.2023; 24(7): 645.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic value of albumin-to-globulin ratio in COVID-19 patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Juan R. Ulloque-Badaracco, Melany D. Mosquera-Rojas, Enrique A. Hernandez-Bustamante, Esteban A. Alarcón-Braga, Percy Herrera-Añazco, Vicente A. Benites-Zapata
    Heliyon.2022; 8(5): e09457.     CrossRef
Review article
F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the infection of heart
Eunjung Kong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(2):95-106.   Published online October 15, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00479
  • 6,810 View
  • 109 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Infections involving the heart are becoming increasingly common, and a timely diagnosis of utmost importance, despite its challenges. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a recently introduced diagnostic tool in cardiology. This review focuses on the current evidence for the use of FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, cardiac implantable device infection, left ventricular assist device infection, and secondary complications. The author discusses considerations when using FDG PET/CT in routine clinical practice, patient preparation for reducing physiologic myocardial uptake, acquisition of images, and interpretation of PET/CT findings. This review also functions to highlight the need for a standardized acquisition protocol.

Citations

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  • The Role of the 18F-FDG PET/CT in the Management of Patients Suspected of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices’ Infection
    Antonio Rosario Pisani, Dino Rubini, Corinna Altini, Rossella Ruta, Maria Gazzilli, Angela Sardaro, Francesca Iuele, Nicola Maggialetti, Giuseppe Rubini
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2024; 14(1): 65.     CrossRef
  • The detection of infectious endocarditis may be enhanced by a repeat FDG-PET while maintaining patients on a ketogenic diet
    Marine Germaini, Caroline Boursier, François Goehringer, Christine Selton-Suty, Benjamin Lefevre, Véronique Roch, Laetitia Imbert, Marine Claudin, Elodie Chevalier, Pierre-Yves Marie
    Journal of Nuclear Cardiology.2022; 29(6): 3256.     CrossRef
Focused Review article
Novel respiratory infectious diseases in Korea
Hyun Jung Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):286-295.   Published online September 23, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00633
  • 7,022 View
  • 77 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Respiratory infections are very common and highly contagious. Respiratory infectious diseases affect not only the person infected but also the family members and the society. As medical sciences advance, several diseases have been conquered; however, the impact of novel infectious diseases on the society is enormous. As the clinical presentation of respiratory infections is similar regardless of the pathogen, the causative agent is not distinguishable by symptoms alone. Moreover, it is difficult to develop a cure because of the various viral mutations. Various respiratory infectious diseases ranging from influenza, which threaten the health of mankind globally, to the coronavirus disease 2019, which resulted in a pandemic, exist. Contrary to human expectations that development in health care and improvement in hygiene will conquer infectious diseases, humankind’s health and social systems are threatened by novel infectious diseases. Owing to the development of transport and trading activity, the rate of spread of new infectious diseases is increasing. As respiratory infections can threaten the members of the global community at any time, investigations on preventing the transmission of these diseases as well as development of effective antivirals and vaccines are of utmost importance and require a worldwide effort.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Barriers to and facilitators of populational adherence to prevention and control measures of COVID-19 and other respiratory infectious diseases: a qualitative evidence synthesis
    Tácito Zaildo, Thayla Amorim Santino, Gabriela Chaves, Baldomero Antonio Kato da Silva, João Carlos Alchieri, Cecilia M. Patino, Sarah Leite, Kleber Giovanni Luz, Ricardo Oliveira Guerra, Tito Hugo Soares da Penha, Gabriel Rodrigues da Silva, Ada Cristina
    European Respiratory Review.2023; 32(168): 220238.     CrossRef
  • Diarylpentanoids, the privileged scaffolds in antimalarial and anti‐infectives drug discovery: A review
    Amirah H. Ramli, Siti M. Mohd Faudzi
    Archiv der Pharmazie.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Infectious Respiratory Diseases Decreased during the COVID-19 Pandemic in South Korea
    Da Hae Kim, Thi Mai Nguyen, Jin Hee Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(11): 6008.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
    Jin Hong Chung
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(4): 251.     CrossRef
Original article
Factors affecting complications after treatment of epidermal cyst
Man Ki Choi, Kyu Jin Chung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2019;36(2):136-140.   Published online April 1, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00164
  • 8,171 View
  • 110 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Epidermal cysts are the most common benign epithelial tumors in humans. The curative treatment of epidermal cyst is surgical excision. However, only few studies have investigated the cause and mechanism of postoperative complications of epidermal cysts. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the factors affecting complications of epidermal cyst after surgical treatment.
Methods
Patients with histologically diagnosed epidermal cysts were selected from among 98 consecutive patients with excised benign cystic tumors from March 2014 to August 2017. Sex, age, size, mobility, site of occurrence, history of infection, history of incision and drainage, complications, history of reoperation, and method of overcoming complications was obtained by analyzing medical records retrospectively.
Results
Five of the 98 patients had wound dehiscence due to surgical infection. Three of them underwent wound healing with conservative treatment without a second operation. The other two patients underwent a second operation and showed signs of preoperative infection. None of the factors showed statistical significance in relation to the occurrence of complications.
Conclusion
Postoperative complications occurred when the excision of the epidermal cyst was performed at preoperative infection sites or at sites with high tension, so attention should be paid to postoperative care.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Epidermoid cyst in lower lip mimicking Keratoacanthoma: A rare case report
    V. Tharani, Nandhini Gunasekaran, K.K. Raja, Ramesh Kumar A
    Oral Oncology Reports.2024; 9: 100178.     CrossRef
  • Intradural intramedullary epidermoid cyst in a 17-year-old male: An exceptionally rare case report and review of the literature
    Babak Alijani, Sahand Karimzadhagh, Elahe Abbaspour, Zoheir Reihanian, Mohammad Haghani Dogahe, Nooshin Zaresharifi
    International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.2024; 116: 109331.     CrossRef
  • Intradiploic Epidermoid Cyst of the Posterior Fossa – Case Report and Review of the Literature
    Gonçalo Januário, Bruno Cunha, Ludovica Cellini, Gonçalo Novais
    Arquivos Brasileiros de Neurocirurgia: Brazilian Neurosurgery.2023; 42(01): e73.     CrossRef
  • Development of Multiple Epidermal Inclusion Cysts After Radiofrequency Microtenotomy for Plantar Fasciitis: A Case Report
    Jennifer Skolnik, Jane Pontious, Todd Hasenstein
    The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery.2021; 60(5): 1088.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Puerperal septic shock and necrotizing fasciitis caused by Staphylococcus caprae and Escherichia coli
Yu-Jin Koo
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(2):248-252.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.2.248
  • 6,343 View
  • 69 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Puerperal sepsis is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Postpartum pelvic infections can cause various complications, including wound infections and necrotizing fasciitis. Several microorganisms are known to cause such infections; however, no study has reported on Staphylococcus caprae, a coagulase-negative staphylococcus that is isolated frequently from animals and infrequently from human specimens, as a causative agent. Here, we report a rare case of septic shock complicated by necrotizing fasciitis after a cesarean section. This is the first report of a human isolate of S. caprae in association with puerperal sepsis and necrotizing fasciitis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors Affecting Postpartum Infection: A Systematic Review
    Maryam Malmir, Narges Azizi Boroojerdi, Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi, Parisa Parsa
    Infectious Disorders - Drug Targets.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
A successful management after preterm delivery in a patient with severe sepsis during third-trimester pregnancy
Moni Ra, Myungkyu Kim, Mincheol Kim, Sangwoo Shim, Seong Yeon Hong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):84-88.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.84
  • 5,771 View
  • 45 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 33-year-old woman visited the emergency department presenting with fever and dyspnea. She was pregnant with gestational age of 31 weeks and 6 days. She had dysuria for 7 days, and fever and dyspnea for 1 day. The vital signs were as follows: blood pressure 110/70 mmHg, heart rate 118 beats/minute, respiratory rate 28/minute, body temperature 38.7℃, and oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry 84% during inhalation of 5 liters of oxygen by nasal prongs. Crackles were heard over both lung fields. There were no signs of uterine contractions. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography scan showed multiple consolidations and air bronchograms in both lungs. According to urinalysis, there was pyuria and microscopic hematuria. She was diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia and urinary tract infection (UTI) that progressed to severe sepsis and acute respiratory failure. We found extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli in the blood culture and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the sputum culture. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit with administration of antibiotics and supplementation of high-flow oxygen. On hospital day 2, hypoxemia was aggravated. She underwent endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. After 3 hours, fetal distress was suspected. Under 100% fraction of inspired oxygen, her oxygen partial pressure was 87 mmHg in the arterial blood. She developed acute kidney injury and thrombocytopenia. We diagnosed her with multi-organ failure due to severe sepsis. After an emergent cesarean section, pneumonia, UTI, and other organ failures gradually recovered. The patient and baby were discharged soon thereafter.
Original Articles
Clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infections according to respiratory viruses in hospitalized children without underlying disease during the last 3 years
Min Hae Seo, Hyung Young Kim, Tae Min Um, Hye Young Kim, Hee Ju Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2017;34(2):182-190.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2017.34.2.182
  • 2,425 View
  • 28 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Respiratory viruses play a significant role in the etiology of acute respiratory infections and exacerbation of chronic respiratory illnesses. This study was conducted to identify the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of children with acute viral lower respiratory infections. METHODS: This study investigated 1,168 children diagnosed with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections (RTIs) between January 2012 and December 2014. Specimens of respiratory viruses were collected using a nasopharyngeal swab and analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and analyzed the clinical features of children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory infections. RESULTS: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of infection in children aged <5 years, was the most commonly detected pathogen in children with bronchiolitis and pneumonia, and resulted in high proportions of children requiring oxygen treatment and intensive care unit admission. Rhinovirus was preceded by RSV as the second most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia, and was detected most frequently in the children aged ≥6 years. In addition, asthma was predominantly caused by rhinovirus in children aged ≥6 years, whereas croup was mostly caused by parainfluenza virus in those aged <5 years. Rhinovirus infection (p < 0.001) and history of asthma (p=0.049) were identified as significant risk factors for readmission within a month. CONCLUSION: We identified the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of respiratory viruses in children with acute lower respiratory infections during the last 3 years. Our findings may provide useful clinical insight to comprehend the acute viral lower RTIs in children.
Urinary tract infections in pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia.
Kyoo Hyun Suh, Sun Young Park, Sae Yoon Kim, Jae Min Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2016;33(2):105-111.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2016.33.2.105
  • 2,288 View
  • 20 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Neutropenic fever is one of the most common and potentially severe complications of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients, while urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most prevalent bacterial infections in these patients. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate features of UTI with neutropenic fever in pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed and analyzed the medical records, laboratory results and image findings of cases of neutropenic fever in the Department of Pediatrics of Yeungnam University Medical Center, South Korea between November 2013 and May 2015. Episodes were divided into two groups, UTI vs. non-UTI group according to the results of urine culture. The results were then compared between groups. The analysis was performed using IBM SPSS 23.0. A p-value <0.05 was considered to indicate a significant difference between groups. RESULTS: Overall, 112 episodes of neutropenic fever were analyzed, among which 22 episodes (19.6%) showed organisms on urine culture and were classified as UTI. The remaining 90 episodes were classified as non-UTI. Only four episodes (18.2%) of the UTI group showed pyuria on urine analysis. In the UTI group, 76.5% were sensitive to the first line antibiotics and showed higher clinical response than the non-UTI group. Among hematologic malignancy patients, the UTI group revealed higher serum β 2-microglobulin levels than the non-UTI group (1.56±0.43 mg/L vs. 1.2±0.43 mg/L, p<0.028). CONCLUSION: UTI in pediatric neutropenic fever responds well to antibiotics. Hematologic malignancy cases with UTI reveal increased serum β2-microglobulin level. These results will be helpful to early phase diagnosis of UTI.
Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Respiratory Viruses in Pediatric Inpatients in a Single Medical Center in Daegu from 2010 to 2012.
Eun Kyung Lee, Yun Young Lee, Kwang Hae Choi
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2013;30(2):95-100.   Published online December 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2013.30.2.95
  • 1,998 View
  • 5 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
This study was performed to investigate the epidemiologic and clinical features of acute respiratory viral infection in hospitalized children. METHODS: From 2010 to 2012, we tested nasopharyngeal swab specimen in 1,584 hospitalized children with multiple real-time polymerase chain reactions to identify 10 kinds of respiratory viruses (including influenza virus A, B (FluA, FluB), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (MPV), adenovirus (AdV), human coronavirus (CoronaV), human enterovirus (HEV), human bocavirus (HBoV), parainfluenza virus (PIV), and human rhinovirus (Rhinovirus)). We analyzed the positive rate, annual and seasonal variations, and clinical features (respiratory tract and non-respiratory tract) according to the retrospective review of medical records. RESULTS: Respiratory viruses were detected from 678 (42.8%) of 1,584 patients. The most common detected virus was RSV (35.0%), and then AdV (19.0%), HEV (18.1%). The critical period of the respiratory viral infection was during the first 12 months of a child's life. PIV increased by 8.4%, 12.1%, and 21.1% annually. Bronchiolitis was most frequently caused by RSV, and croup was frequently caused by PIV. The most common cause of meningitis was HEV. Hepatitis-associated respiratory virus was developed 111 in 678 cases. CONCLUSION: Although this study was confined to a single medical center for three years, we identified the epidemiology and clinical feature of respiratory viruses in Daegu from 2010 to 2012. Future surveillance will be necessary for annual and seasonal variations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Renal infarction associated with low dose intravenous immunoglobulin in a kidney transplant recipient with sepsis: a case report and literature review
    Eun Woo Choi, Jun Young Do, A. Young Kim, Seok Hui Kang
    BMC Nephrology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Correlation between Infection with Multiple Respiratory Viruses and Length of Hospital Stay in Patients from Cheonan, Korea
    Jae-Sik Jeon, Jin-Wan Park, Jae Kyung Kim
    The Korean Journal of Clinical Laboratory Science.2017; 49(1): 22.     CrossRef
  • Infection Frequency and Mixed infection on Eight Viruses from Patients with Acute Respiratory Syndromes in Seoul
    Heejin Ham, Jungim Jang, Sukju Jo, Younghee Oh, Sonil Pak
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2014; 44(3): 274.     CrossRef
Comparative Study on the Infection Rates of Protected Environment versus Non-Protected Environment in Acute Myeloid Leukemia during Remission Induction Chemotherapy.
Se Hoon Sohn, Ha young Lee, Dong Geun Kim, Sung Woo Park, Myung Jin Kim, Myung Jin Oh, Hye Deok Woo, Hun Mo Ryoo, Sung Hwa Bae, Kyung Hee Lee, Min Kyoung Kim, Myung Soo Hyun
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2010;27(2):113-121.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2010.27.2.113
  • 1,771 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
AND PURPOSE: Patients with acute leukemia experience prolonged periods of neutropenia due to their disease or its treatment. For this reason, they often develop serious infectious complications. Although antibiotic therapy has improved in recent years, the fatality rate from infection remains high. For the control of infection, protected environment was developed. But because of economic issue, most of chemotherapy with acute myeloid leukemia have conducted in non-protected environment. So this study compared the rate of complete remission, days with neutropenia, rate of fever, rate of positive culture, rate of overt infection and use of antibacterial and antifungal agents with patients within non-protected environment and protected environment, retrospectively. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia during first remission induction chemotherapy were eligible for this study. METHODS: Retrospective analysis was conducted between patients in non-protected (25 patients) and protected environment (14 patients) with acute myeloid leukemia during remission induction chemotherapy. RESULTS: Rate of overt infection, rate of fever, rate of positive culture and rate of use of antibiotics were significantly high in patients within non-protected environment compared with patients within protected environment. There were no differences in rate of complete remission and days of neutropenia. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests protected environment for patients with acute myeloid leukemia during remission induction chemotherapy could reduce rate of overt infection, and rate of use of antibiotics.
Case Report
A Case of Exit-Site Infection and Abscess by Mycobacterium Abscessus in a CAPD Patient.
Sun Young Jung, Ji Hoon Na, Kyu Hyang Cho, Jong Won Park, Jun Young Do, Kyeung Woo Yun, In Wook Song, Jeong Hwan Cho, Chang Woo Son
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2009;26(2):137-143.   Published online December 31, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2009.26.2.137
  • 1,794 View
  • 3 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections are a rare, but clinically important cause of infections in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. This is typically suspected when a patient does not respond to treatment with the usual antibiotics. We describe here a case of Mycobacterium abscessus exit site infection with abdominal wall abscess formation that was associated with CAPD, which required peritoneal catheter removal, surgical debridement of the abscess and long term antibiotic therapy.

Citations

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  • A Case Report ofMycobacterium abscessusPeritonitis in a Patient on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis
    Seon Joo Kang, Heungsoo Kim, Kyoung Un Park, Young Ae Lim, Wee Gyo Lee
    Annals of Clinical Microbiology.2013; 16(2): 101.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Continuous Ambulatory Peritonitis Dialysis Peritonitis Due toStenotrophomonas maltophiliaUsing Antibiotic Combination
    Hee Sung Ko, Ah Ran Choi, Tae Hoon Kim, Chan Hee Kyung, Jang Ho Cho, Yong Hoon Kim, Jung Eun Lee
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2013; 30(2): 109.     CrossRef
Original Article
The Effects of Catheter Revision and Mupirocin on Exit Site Infection/Peritonitis in CAPD Patients.
Jun Beom Park, Jung Mee Kim, Jun Hyuk Choi, Kyu Hyang Jo, Hang Jae Jung, Yeung Jin Kim, Jun Yeung Do, Kyung Woo Yoon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 1999;16(2):347-356.   Published online December 31, 1999
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.1999.16.2.347
  • 1,607 View
  • 1 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Exit site/tunnel infection causes cosiderable morbidity and technique failure in CAPD patients. We presently use a unique revision method for the treatment of refractory ESI/TI in CAPD patients and mupirocin prophylaxis for high risk patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed 139 CAPD patients about the ESI/TI from October 1993 to February 1999 at Yeungnam University Hospital. At the beginning of the ESI, we usually started medications with rifampicin and ciprofloxacin and then changed the antibiotics according to the sensitivity test. If the ESI had persisted and there were T1 symptoms(purulent discharge, abscess lesion around exit site), we performed catheter revision(external cuff shaving, disinfection around tunnel and new exit site on opposit direction) with a combination of proper antibiotics. We applied local mupirocin ointment at the exit site three times per week to the 34 patients who had the risk of ESI starting from October 1998. RESULTS: The total follow-up was 2401 patient months(pt. mon). ESI occurred on 105 occasions in 36 out of 139 patients, and peritonitis occurred on 112 occasions in 67 out of 139 patients. The total number of incidences of ESI and peritonitis was 1 per 23.0 pt.mon and 0 per 21.6 pt.mon. The most common organism responsible for ESI was Staphylococcus aureus(26 of 54 isolated cases, 48%), followed by the Methicillin resistant S. auresu(MRSA) (13 cases, 24%). Seven patients(5: MRSA, 2: Pseudomonas) had to be treated with a revision to control infection. Three patients experienced ESI relapse after revision. One of them improved with antibiotics, while another needed a second revision and the remaining required catheter removal due to persistent MRSA infection with re-insertion at the same time. But, there was no more ESI in these 3 patients who were received management to relapse (The mean duration: 14.0 months). The rates of ESI were significantly reduced after using mupirocin than before(1 per 12.7 vs 34.0 pt.mon, p<0.01). CONCLUSION: In summary, revision technique can be regarded as an effective method for refractory ESI/T1 before catheter removal. Also local mupirocin ointment can play a significant role in the prevention of ESI.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science