Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

Indexed in: ESCI, Scopus, PubMed,
PubMed Central, CAS, DOAJ, KCI
FREE article processing charge
OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
7 "Acute kidney injury"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Review article
Comprehensive overview of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of acute kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury: a narrative review
Min-Ji Kim, Chang Joo Oh, Chang-Won Hong, Jae-Han Jeon
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2024;41(2):61-73.   Published online February 14, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2023.01347
  • 1,928 View
  • 97 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Acute kidney ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a life-threatening condition that predisposes individuals to chronic kidney disease. Since the kidney is one of the most energy-demanding organs in the human body and mitochondria are the powerhouse of cells, mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of IR-induced acute kidney injury. Mitochondrial dysfunction causes a reduction in adenosine triphosphate production, loss of mitochondrial dynamics (represented by persistent fragmentation), and impaired mitophagy. Furthermore, the pathological accumulation of succinate resulting from fumarate reduction under oxygen deprivation (ischemia) in the reverse flux of the Krebs cycle can eventually lead to a burst of reactive oxygen species driven by reverse electron transfer during the reperfusion phase. Accumulating evidence indicates that improving mitochondrial function, biogenesis, and dynamics, and normalizing metabolic reprogramming within the mitochondria have the potential to preserve kidney function during IR injury and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the detrimental role of metabolic reprogramming and mitochondrial dysfunction in IR injury and explore potential therapeutic strategies for treating kidney IR injury.
Original article
Analysis of the risk factors of acute kidney injury after total hip or knee replacement surgery
Yoo Jin Lee, Bong Soo Park, Sihyung Park, Jin Han Park, Il Hwan Kim, Junghae Ko, Yang Wook Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(2):136-141.   Published online October 27, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00542
  • 6,177 View
  • 99 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI), which increases the risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality, poses a major concern to surgeons. We conducted this study to analyze the risk factors associated with the occurrence of AKI after orthopedic surgery.
Methods
This was a retrospective study that included 351 patients who underwent total hip or knee replacement surgery at Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital between January 2012 and December 2016.
Results
AKI occurred in 13 (3.7%) of the 351 patients. The patients’ preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 66.66±34.02 mL/min/1.73 m2 in the AKI group and 78.07±21.23 mL/min/1.73 m2 in the non-AKI group. The hemoglobin levels were 11.21±1.65 g/dL in the AKI group and 12.39±1.52 g/dL in the non-AKI group. Hemoglobin level was related to increased risk of AKI (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02–0.68; p=0.016). Administration of crystalloid or colloid fluid alone and the perioperative amount of fluid did not show any significant relationship with AKI. Further analysis of the changes in eGFR was performed using a cutoff value of 7.54. The changes in eGFR were significantly related to decreased risk of AKI (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.61–0.89; p=0.002).
Conclusion
Renal function should be monitored closely after orthopedic surgery if patients have chronic kidney disease and low hemoglobin level. Predicting the likelihood of AKI occurrence, early treatment of high-risk patients, and monitoring perioperative laboratory test results, including eGFR, will help improve patient prognosis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Supplemental oxygen is associated with increased complications and readmission following total shoulder arthroplasty
    Nikhil Vallabhaneni, Alexander S. Guareschi, Josef K. Eichinger, Richard J. Friedman
    Seminars in Arthroplasty: JSES.2023; 33(3): 512.     CrossRef
  • Acute kidney injury after primary total hip replacement
    M. L. Lebed, M. G. Kirpichenko, E. V. Novikova, T. G. Lebed, A. V. Mankov
    Acta Biomedica Scientifica.2023; 8(5): 125.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Acute decompensated heart failure and acute kidney injury due to bilateral renal artery stenosis.
Ho Jin Jung, Won Suk Choi, Hyun Jae Kang, Byung Chun Jung, Bong Ryeol Lee, Jong Joo Lee, Jun Young Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2015;32(2):146-151.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2015.32.2.146
  • 1,787 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) may result in hypertension, azotemia, and acute pulmonary edema. We report on a renal angioplasty with stent placement for bilateral RAS in a patient with acute decompensated heart failure and acute kidney injury. A 67-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with acute shortness of breath and generalized edema. Echocardiography showed left ventricular wall motion abnormality and the follow up electrocardiography showed T wave inversion in the precordial leads. We performed a coronary angiography to differentiate ischemic heart disease from non-cardiac origin for the cause of the heart failure. The coronary angiography showed no significant luminal narrowing, but bilateral RAS was confirmed on the renal artery angiography, therefore, we performed renal artery revascularization. After the procedure, the pulmonary edema was improved and the serum creatinine was decreased. Two weeks later, an echocardiography showed improvement of the left ventricular systolic function.
Amlodipine intoxication complicated by acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis.
In Hee Lee, Gun Woo Kang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2015;32(1):17-21.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2015.32.1.17
  • 2,011 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker of the dihydropyridine group, is commonly used in management of hypertension, angina, and myocardial infarction. Amlodipine overdose, characterized by severe hypotension, arrythmias, and pulmonary edema, has seldom been reported in Korean literature. We report on a fatal case of amlodipine intoxication with complications including rhabdomyolysis and oliguric acute kidney injury. A 70-year-old woman with a medical history of hypertension was presented at the author's hospital 6 hours after ingestion of 50 amlodipine (norvasc) tablets (total dosage 250 mg) in an attempted suicide. Her laboratory tests showed a serum creatinine level of 2.5 mg/dL, with elevated serum creatine phosphokinase and myoglobin. The patient was initially treated with fluids, alkali, calcium gluconate, glucagon, and vasopressors without a hemodynamic effect. High-dose insulin therapy was also started with a bolus injection of regular insulin (RI), followed by continuous infusion of RI and 50% dextrose with water. Despite intensive treatment including insulin therapy, inotropics, mechanical ventilation, and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration, the patient died of refractory shock and cardiac arrest with no signs of renal recovery 116 hours after her hospital admission.
Autoimmune thyroiditis with minimal change disease presenting acute kidney injury.
Ji Su Kim, Chi Young Park, Suk Pyo Shin, Yeong Min Lim, Eun Jung Ko, Hyung Jong Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2014;31(2):127-130.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2014.31.2.127
  • 2,084 View
  • 3 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Autoimmune thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the world. It is characterized clinically by gradual thyroid failure, goiter formation, or both, because of the autoimmune-mediated destruction of the thyroid gland. Renal involvement presenting proteinuria in autoimmune thyroiditis is not uncommon, occurring in 10% to 30% of the cases. Glomerulonephropathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, however, is a rare disease. Most reports of autoimmune thyroiditis with glomerulonephropathy have demonstrated a mixed pathological morphology and have been predominantly associated with membranous glomerulopathy. The case of minimal-change disease associated with thyroiditis presenting acute kidney injury is a rare disease that has not been reported in South Korea. Reported herein is the case of a 16-year-old man diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, with minimal-change disease presenting acute kidney injury. He revealed hypothyroidism, proteinuria, and impaired renal function. Renal biopsy showed minimal-change disease and minimal tubular atrophy. The patient was treated with thyroid hormone, and his renal function and proteinuria improved. Therefore, for patients with autoimmune thyroiditis presenting unexplained proteinuria, glomerulonephropathy should be ruled out. Conversely, for patients with glomerulonephropathy and persistent proteinuria despite proper treatment, thyroid function and antibody tests should be performed.
A Case of Recurrent Exercise-Induced Acute Renal Failure and Renal Hypouricemia with R90H Mutation in a SCL22A12 Gene.
Ae Jin Kim, Soo Yong Park, Ji Yong Jung, Jae Hyun Chang, Hyun Hee Lee, Wook Yung Chung, Han Ro
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2012;29(2):150-152.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2012.29.2.150
  • 1,819 View
  • 3 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Acute renal failure with severe loin pain and patch renal ischemia after anaerobic exercise (ALPE) is a rare cause of exercise-induced acute kidney injury. Some ALPE patients also have renal hypouricemia. Mutations in the SCL22A12 gene are among the major factors of hypouricemia. Education for the prevention of relapse and genetic counseling should be recommended to ALPE patients with renal hypouricemia. This paper reports a 25-year-old man who showed recurrent exercise-induced ARF and renal hypouricemia with R90H mutation in his SCL22A12 gene.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Case Report of Familial Renal Hypouricemia Confirmed by Genotyping of SLC22A12, and a Literature Review
    Hyung Oh Kim, Chun-Gyoo Ihm, Kyung Hwan Jeong, Hyun Joon Kang, Jae-Min Kim, Hyung Suk Lim, Jin Sug Kim, Tae Won Lee
    Electrolytes & Blood Pressure.2015; 13(2): 52.     CrossRef
Rhabdomyolysis and Mild Kidney Injury in a Patient with Acute Hepatitis A.
Gu Min Cho, Chang Wook Kim, Hyeonjin Seong, Joon Hur, Bu Seok Jeon, Jonghwan Lee, Eun Hui Sim, Seok Jong Lee, Chang Don Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2012;29(1):28-30.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2012.29.1.28
  • 2,133 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 48-year-old male visited the emergency room of the authors' hospital due to nausea, vomiting, and myalgia for four days. Acute hepatitis A was identified from the serologic marker of the hepatitis A virus. Mild elevation of the serum creatinine and creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) suggested rhabomyolysis, which was confirmed with the serum aldolase, myoglobin, and urine myoglobin. With supportive care, both the liver and renal functions were recovered gradually and fully. This case shows that rhabdomyolysis can be one of the mechanisms of renal complication in cases of acute symptomatic hepatitis A.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science