Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

Indexed in: ESCI, Scopus, PubMed,
PubMed Central, CAS, DOAJ, KCI
FREE article processing charge
OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse Articles > Previous issues
17 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Funded articles
Volume 37(4); October 2020
Prev issue Next issue
Editorial
Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
Jin Hong Chung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):251-252.   Published online September 2, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00661
  • 4,407 View
  • 107 Download
PDF
Focused Review articles
An update on the role of bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of pulmonary disease
June Hong Ahn
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):253-261.   Published online August 28, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00584
  • 9,543 View
  • 249 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Bronchoscopy has evolved over the past few decades and has been used by respiratory physicians to diagnose various airway and lung diseases. With the popularization of medical check-ups and growing interest in health, early diagnosis of lung diseases is essential. With the development of endobronchial ultrasound, ultrathin bronchoscopy, and electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy, bronchoscopy has been able to widen its scope in diagnosing pulmonary diseases. In this review, we have described the brief history, role, and complications of bronchoscopy used in diagnosing pulmonary lesions, from simple flexible bronchoscopy to bronchoscopy combined with several up-to-date technologies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Disposable Versus Reusable Bronchoscopes: A Narrative Review of Cost-effectiveness, Risk of Cross-contamination and Environmental Impact
    Illaa Smesseim, Johannes M.A. Daniels, Jouke Annema, Peter I. Bonta, Dirk-Jan Slebos
    Archivos de Bronconeumología.2024; 60(4): 250.     CrossRef
  • Flexible bronchoscopy indications and outcomes between indigenous and non‐indigenous patients in the Northern Territory of Australia
    Mohammad M. Seyedshahabedin, Timothy P. Howarth, Lin Mo, Edwina Biancardi, Subash S. Heraganahally
    Internal Medicine Journal.2023; 53(9): 1634.     CrossRef
  • Endobronchial ultrasound‐guided re‐biopsy of non–small cell lung cancer with acquired resistance after EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment
    Kyung Soo Hong, Jinmo Cho, Jong Geol Jang, Min Hye Jang, June Hong Ahn
    Thoracic Cancer.2023; 14(4): 363.     CrossRef
  • Observational findings of transbronchial lung biopsy in patients with interstitial lung disease: a retrospective study in Aleppo University Hospital
    Fateh Kashkash, Abdullah Khorri
    Annals of Medicine & Surgery.2023; 85(2): 146.     CrossRef
  • Invasive Diagnostic Procedures from Bronchoscopy to Surgical Biopsy—Optimization of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Samples for Molecular Testing
    Nensi Lalić, Aleksandra Lovrenski, Miroslav Ilić, Olivera Ivanov, Marko Bojović, Ivica Lalić, Spasoje Popević, Mihailo Stjepanović, Nataša Janjić
    Medicina.2023; 59(10): 1723.     CrossRef
  • Utility of Radial Probe Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Lung Biopsy in Bronchus Sign Negative Peripheral Pulmonary Lesions
    Kyung Soo Hong, Kwan Ho Lee, Jin Hong Chung, Kyeong-Cheol Shin, Hyun Jung Jin, Jong Geol Jang, June Hong Ahn
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Radial Probe Endobronchial Ultrasound Using Guide Sheath-Guided Transbronchial Lung Biopsy in Peripheral Pulmonary Lesions without Fluoroscopy
    Kyung Soo Hong, Heeyun Ahn, Kwan Ho Lee, Jin Hong Chung, Kyeong-Cheol Shin, Hyun Jung Jin, Jong Geol Jang, Seok Soo Lee, Min Hye Jang, June Hong Ahn
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2021; 84(4): 282.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
    Jin Hong Chung
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(4): 251.     CrossRef
Biological treatments for severe asthma
Hyun Jung Jin
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):262-268.   Published online September 11, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00647
  • 6,856 View
  • 179 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe asthma patients comprise about 3% to 13% of all asthma patients, but they have higher hospital utilization rates and higher medical costs than those of nonsevere asthma patients. Treatment methods for severe asthma patients are still lacking; however, the recent development of biologics is expected to have a positive effect. The biological therapies developed so far are mainly aimed at treating asthma patients with type 2 inflammation. These biologics have been found to reduce symptoms of asthma, improve lung function, reduce the use of oral corticosteroids, and improve quality of life of patients. This article reviews the mechanism of action and indications for approved biologics and discusses what should be considered when choosing biologics.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Current and Novel Biologic Therapies for Patients with Asthma and Nasal Polyps
    Hanna K. Mandl, Jessa E. Miller, Daniel M. Beswick
    Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America.2024; 57(2): 225.     CrossRef
  • Moderate-High Blood Eosinophilia Is Associated with Increased Hospitalization and Other Asthma Comorbidities
    Sara Naharro-González, Clara Lorente-Sorolla, José Manuel Rodrigo-Muñoz, Marcela Valverde-Monge, Erwin Javier Pinillos-Robles, Diana Betancor, Mar Fernández-Nieto, Diana Sánchez-Mellado, Marta Gil-Martínez, Jessica Mireya Santillán-Coello, José Miguel Vil
    Biomolecules.2024; 14(1): 126.     CrossRef
  • Biologic Therapies across Nasal Polyp Subtypes
    Kody G. Bolk, Sarah K. Wise
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2024; 14(4): 432.     CrossRef
  • Incremental net monetary benefit of biologic therapies in moderate to severe asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis of economic evaluation studies
    Sajesh K. Veettil, Vanessa Vincent, Taylor Shufelt, Emma Behan, M. Sakil Syeed, Ammarin Thakkinstian, David C. Young, Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk
    Journal of Asthma.2023; 60(9): 1702.     CrossRef
  • Tackling the cytokine storm using advanced drug delivery in allergic airway disease
    Vyoma K. Patel, Sukriti Vishwas, Rajan Kumar, Gabriele De Rubis, Shakti D. Shukla, Keshav Raj Paudel, Bikash Manandhar, Thakur Gurjeet Singh, Dinesh Kumar Chellappan, Monica Gulati, Indu Pal Kaur, Venkata Sita Rama Raju Allam, Philip M. Hansbro, Brian G.
    Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology.2023; 82: 104366.     CrossRef
  • The evolving landscape of immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic conditions
    Aarti Pandya, Esosa Adah, Bridgette Jones, Rachel Chevalier
    Clinical and Translational Science.2023; 16(8): 1294.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Dupilumab in Korean Patients With Uncontrolled Moderate-to-Severe Asthma: A LIBERTY ASTHMA QUEST Sub-analysis
    Chin Kook Rhee, Jung-Won Park, Heung-Woo Park, You Sook Cho
    Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research.2022; 14(2): 182.     CrossRef
  • The role of peripheral eosinophilia in diagnosing lung disorders: experience from a single pneumonological center
    Justyna Fijołek, Elzbieta Wiatr, Dorota Piotrowska-Kownacka, Kazimierz Roszkowski-Sliz
    Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
    Jin Hong Chung
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(4): 251.     CrossRef
Therapeutic potential of targeting kinase inhibition in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Suji Kim, Jae Hyang Lim, Chang-Hoon Woo
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):269-276.   Published online July 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00458
  • 9,282 View
  • 244 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Fibrosis is characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components. The fibrotic process ultimately leads to organ dysfunction and failure in chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis, advanced kidney disease, and liver cirrhosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a common form of progressive and chronic interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology. Pathophysiologically, the parenchyma of the lung alveoli, interstitium, and capillary endothelium becomes scarred and stiff, which makes breathing difficult because the lungs have to work harder to transfer oxygen and carbon dioxide between the alveolar space and bloodstream. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-) signaling pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and scarring of the lung tissue. Recent clinical trials focused on the development of pharmacological agents that either directly or indirectly target kinases for the treatment of IPF. Therefore, to develop therapeutic targets for pulmonary fibrosis, it is essential to understand the key factors involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and the underlying signaling pathway. The objective of this review is to discuss the role of kinase signaling cascades in the regulation of either TGF--dependent or other signaling pathways, including Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase, c-jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase pathways, and potential therapeutic targets in IPF.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Targeting Growth Factor and Cytokine Pathways to Treat Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
    Hongbo Ma, Shengming Liu, Shanrui Li, Yong Xia
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D3 alleviates pulmonary fibrosis by regulating the MAPK pathway via targeting PSAT1 expression in vivo and in vitro
    Wenxiang Zhu, Qi Ding, Lu Wang, Gonghao Xu, Yirui Diao, Sihao Qu, Sheng Chen, Yuanyuan Shi
    International Immunopharmacology.2021; 101: 108212.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
    Jin Hong Chung
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(4): 251.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Pirfenidone and Nintedanib on Markers of Systemic Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Preliminary Report
    Alessandro G. Fois, Elisabetta Sotgiu, Valentina Scano, Silvia Negri, Sabrina Mellino, Elisabetta Zinellu, Pietro Pirina, Gianfranco Pintus, Ciriaco Carru, Arduino A. Mangoni, Angelo Zinellu
    Antioxidants.2020; 9(11): 1064.     CrossRef
Diagnosis and treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis
Jong Geol Jang, Jin Hong Chung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):277-285.   Published online September 4, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00626
  • 16,923 View
  • 552 Download
  • 53 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major health problem worldwide. Especially, multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), which is defined as TB that shows resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin, is a barrier in the treatment of TB. Globally, approximately 3.4% of new TB patients and 20% of the patients with a history of previous treatment for TB were diagnosed with MDR-TB. The treatment of MDR-TB requires medications for a long duration (up to 20–24 months) with less effective and toxic second-line drugs and has unfavorable outcomes. However, treatment outcomes are expected to improve due to the introduction of a new agent (bedaquiline), repurposed drugs (linezolid, clofazimine, and cycloserine), and technological advancement in rapid drug sensitivity testing. The World Health Organization (WHO) released a rapid communication in 2018, followed by consolidated guidelines for the treatment of MDR-TB in 2019 based on clinical trials and an individual patient data meta-analysis. In these guidelines, the WHO suggested reclassification of second-line anti-TB drugs and recommended oral treatment regimens that included the new and repurposed agents. The aims of this article are to review the treatment strategies of MDR-TB based on the 2019 WHO guidelines regarding the management of MDR-TB and the diagnostic techniques for detecting resistance, including phenotypic and molecular drug sensitivity tests.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Computational insights into potential marine natural products as selective inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA: A structure-based virtual screening study
    Manikandan Jayaraman, Vijayakumar Gosu, Rajalakshmi Kumar, Jeyakanthan Jeyaraman
    Computational Biology and Chemistry.2024; 108: 107991.     CrossRef
  • Targeting of essential mycobacterial replication enzyme DnaG primase revealed Mitoxantrone and Vapreotide as novel mycobacterial growth inhibitors**
    Waseem Ali, Salma Jamal, Rishabh Gangwar, Faraz Ahmed, Rahul Sharma, Meetu Agarwal, Javaid Ahmad Sheikh, Abhinav Grover, Sonam Grover
    Molecular Informatics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Comprehensive Review on Long vs. Short Regimens in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Under Programmatic Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT)
    Ashwin Karnan, Ulhas Jadhav, Babaji Ghewade, Anjana Ledwani, Poorna Shivashankar
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrido-[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-2-amine analogues as antimycobacterial agents
    Boddupalli Venkata Siva Kumar, Yogesh Mahadu Khetmalis, Kosana Sai Chaitanya, Ala Chandu, Gauri Shetye, Rui Ma, Sankaranarayanan Murugesan, Scott G. Franzblau, Kondapalli Venkata Gowri Chandra Sekhar
    Journal of Molecular Structure.2024; 1303: 137600.     CrossRef
  • Direct TAMRA-dUTP labeling of M. tuberculosis genes using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)
    Basma Altattan, Jasmin Ullrich, Emily Mattig, Aline Poppe, Renata Martins, Frank F. Bier
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial peptides as new-generation antibiotics against Mycobacterium
    Parisa Eslami, Adnan Khosravi
    Journal of Preventive, Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies in Medicine.2024; 3(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in an Active Duty Military Health Care Worker
    Amanda E Saunders, Kevin M Shanahan, John W Downs
    Military Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Non-Adherence to Treatment Among Migrants with MDR-TB in Wuhan, China: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Kunhe Lin, Li Xiang
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2024; Volume 17: 727.     CrossRef
  • Development of a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system to deliver delamanid via a pressurized metered dose inhaler for treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis
    Himanshu Paliwal, Titpawan Nakpheng, Pijush Kumar Paul, K. Prem Ananth, Teerapol Srichana
    International Journal of Pharmaceutics.2024; 655: 124031.     CrossRef
  • Drug Targets, Current and Future Therapeutics for the Treatment of Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis with their Clinical Applications: A Critical Review
    Deepshikha Singh, Vikram Singh, Subhankar P. Mandal, Karen Dsouza, B.R. Prashantha Kumar, Sheshagiri R. Dixit
    Current Drug Therapy.2024; 19(3): 317.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology and Management of Infections in Liver Transplant Recipients
    Waseem Amjad, Syed Hamaad Rahman, Thomas D. Schiano, Syed-Mohammed Jafri
    Surgical Infections.2024; 25(4): 272.     CrossRef
  • Survival Probability in Multidrug Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in a South Indian Region
    Thungathurthi Smitha, Pantham Sunitha, Orsu Prabhakar, Sindgi Vasudeva Murthy
    Hospital Pharmacy.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis: Implications for Dentistry
    Xue-Mei Chong, Lucy McClean, Paddy McMaster
    Dental Update.2024; 51(4): 258.     CrossRef
  • The mechanisms and clinical potential of collateral sensitivity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A literature review
    Muhammad Zain Raza, Hafiz Muhammad Ehsan Arshad, Musab Maqsood, Muhammad Hashim Faisal
    The Microbe.2024; 3: 100086.     CrossRef
  • Confronting Tuberculosis: A Synthetic Quinoline-Isonicotinic Acid Hydrazide Hybrid Compound as a Potent Lead Molecule Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Govinda Raju Vadankula, Vipul V. Nilkanth, Arshad Rizvi, Sriram Yandrapally, Anushka Agarwal, Hepshibha Chirra, Rashmita Biswas, Mohammed Arifuddin, Vijay Nema, Alvala Mallika, Shekhar C. Mande, Sharmistha Banerjee
    ACS Infectious Diseases.2024; 10(6): 2288.     CrossRef
  • Advancements in Artificial Intelligence for the Diagnosis of Multidrug Resistance and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: A Comprehensive Review
    Shanmuga Priya K, Anbumaran Parivakkam mani, Geethalakshmi S, Sankalp Yadav
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Opinion review of drug resistant tuberculosis in West Africa: tackling the challenges for effective control
    Isaac Darko Otchere, Adwoa Asante-Poku, Kodjo Francis Akpadja, Awa Ba Diallo, Adama Sanou, Prince Asare, Stephen Osei-Wusu, Nneka Onyejepu, Bassirou Diarra, Yaotsè Anoumou Dagnra, Aderemi Kehinde, Martin Antonio, Dorothy Yeboah-Manu
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advanced integrative molecular platform for high-throughput screening of drug-resistant tuberculosis
    Minal Dakhave, Trupti Rale, Harshada Suryawanshi, Nikita Patil, Abhijeet Suryawanshi, Raju Kumar, Shruti Gadekar, Payal Bhatnagar, Amrita Khaire, Gautam Wankhede
    Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease.2024; 109(4): 116373.     CrossRef
  • The use of additive technologies to increase adherence to treatment, increase the efficiency of chemotherapy and correction of indicators of anxiety and depression among patients with destructive pulmonary tuberculosis
    Alexey G. Naumov, Alexander S. Shprykov, Marina A. Dolgova, Natalia V. Fomina
    Consilium Medicum.2024; 26(03): 199.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Patterns of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Newly Diagnosed Patients in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Cong Jin, Yuting Wu, Jiangpo Chen, Jing Liu, Hongwei Zhang, Qingzeng Qian, Tieliang Pang
    Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationship of 2,6-Disubstituted Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives of Pyridine as Potential Antituberculosis Agents
    Dagmara Ziembicka, Katarzyna Gobis, Małgorzata Szczesio, Andrzej Olczak, Ewa Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Agnieszka Głogowska, Izabela Korona-Głowniak, Krzysztof Bojanowski
    Materials.2023; 16(1): 448.     CrossRef
  • Multidrug-Resistant TB (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug-Resistant TB (XDR-TB) Among Children: Where We Stand Now
    Kona Chowdhury, Rahnuma Ahmad, Susmita Sinha, Siddhartha Dutta, Mainul Haque
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Anxiety and depression level of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two hospitals in Banten province, Indonesia
    Tirta Darmawan Susanto, Allen Widysanto, Darien Alfa Cipta, Arron Tanara, Ghivarell Rizkie Wirawan, Adeline Bercadina Kosim, Christabella Maria Djoni, Ervinna Tantri, Chandni Kumar, Chelsie Angelius
    Dialogues in Health.2023; 2: 100115.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of Previous Tuberculosis Treatment History in Patients with Treatment Failure and the Impact on Acquired Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis
    Soedarsono Soedarsono, Ni Made Mertaniasih, Tutik Kusmiati, Ariani Permatasari, Wiwik Kurnia Ilahi, Amelia Tantri Anggraeni
    Antibiotics.2023; 12(3): 598.     CrossRef
  • Evolution of tuberculosis diagnostics: From molecular strategies to nanodiagnostics
    Srestha Mukherjee, Summaya Perveen, Anjali Negi, Rashmi Sharma
    Tuberculosis.2023; 140: 102340.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of the Diagnostic Utility of GeneXpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis/Rifampicin (MTB/RIF) Assay in the Suspected Cases of Tuberculous Meningitis
    Sakshi Patel, Malti Dadheech, Anand K Maurya, Jitendra Singh, Shashank Purwar, Nirendra Rai, Radha Sarawagi, Ankur Joshi, Sagar Khadanga
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tandem LC-MS Identification of Antitubercular Compounds in Zones of Growth Inhibition Produced by South African Filamentous Actinobacteria
    Daniel J. Watson, Lubbe Wiesner, Tlhalefo Matimela, Denzil Beukes, Paul R. Meyers
    Molecules.2023; 28(11): 4276.     CrossRef
  • Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Stigma Among HealthCare Workers Toward the Development of a Stigma-Reduction Strategy: A Scoping Review
    Lolita Liboon Aranas, Khorshed Alam, Prajwal Gyawali, Rashidul Mahumud Alam
    INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Quality Mindset: The Missing Ingredient in Tuberculosis Care and Control in Togo
    Kossivi Agbélénko Afanvi, Mohammed Fall Dogo, Koffi Atsu Aziagbé, Komi Séraphin Adjoh, Koumavi Kristoli Didier Ekouévi
    European Journal of Theoretical and Applied Sciences.2023; 1(4): 36.     CrossRef
  • Machine Learning of the Whole Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Scoping PRISMA-Based Review
    Ricardo Perea-Jacobo, Guillermo René Paredes-Gutiérrez, Miguel Ángel Guerrero-Chevannier, Dora-Luz Flores, Raquel Muñiz-Salazar
    Microorganisms.2023; 11(8): 1872.     CrossRef
  • Cotreatment With Clofazimine and Rapamycin Eliminates Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis by Inducing Polyfunctional Central Memory T-Cell Responses
    Dhiraj Kumar Singh, Ashima Bhaskar, Isha Pahuja, Aishwarya Shaji, Barnani Moitra, Yufang Shi, Ved Prakash Dwivedi, Gobardhan Das
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2023; 228(9): 1166.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis in children and young adolescents in Brazil
    Fernanda Bruzadelli Paulino da Costa, Thaís Zamboni Berra, Jaqueline Garcia de Almeida Ballestero, Patricia Bartholomay Oliveira, Daniele Maria Pelissari, Yan Mathias Alves, Antônio Carlos Vieira Ramos, Juliana Queiroz Rocha de Paiva, Titilade Kehinde Aya
    Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases.2023; 33: 100388.     CrossRef
  • Tackling Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: New Challenges from the Old Pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Giuseppe Mancuso, Angelina Midiri, Silvia De Gaetano, Elena Ponzo, Carmelo Biondo
    Microorganisms.2023; 11(9): 2277.     CrossRef
  • Drug-resistant Monoarticular Wrist Joint Tuberculosis in Renal Transplant Recipient with Literature Review
    Jasmine Sethi, Vignesh Subramani, Rajender Kumar, Shivakumar Patil, Ashish Sharma
    Indian Journal of Transplantation.2023; 17(3): 371.     CrossRef
  • Predictive capabilities of baseline radiological findings for early and late disease outcomes within sensitive and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis cases
    Gabriel Rosenfeld, Andrei Gabrielian, Darrell Hurt, Alex Rosenthal
    European Journal of Radiology Open.2023; 11: 100518.     CrossRef
  • Nanocarriers in Tuberculosis Treatment: Challenges and Delivery Strategies
    Mahesh Kumar, Tarun Virmani, Girish Kumar, Rohitas Deshmukh, Ashwani Sharma, Sofia Duarte, Pedro Brandão, Pedro Fonte
    Pharmaceuticals.2023; 16(10): 1360.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis on the correlation between HIV infection and multidrug-resistance tuberculosis
    Yulong Song, Qian Jin, Jihai Qiu, Dan Ye
    Heliyon.2023; 9(11): e21956.     CrossRef
  • Current Insights into Diagnosing and Treating Neurotuberculosis in Adults
    Sofiati Dian, Ahmad Rizal Ganiem, Lindsey HM te Brake, Arjan van Laarhoven
    CNS Drugs.2023; 37(11): 957.     CrossRef
  • Economic burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis on patients and households: a global systematic review and meta-analysis
    Temesgen Yihunie Akalu, Archie C. A. Clements, Haileab Fekadu Wolde, Kefyalew Addis Alene
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nano vs Resistant Tuberculosis: Taking the Lung Route
    Deepika Sharma, Pooja, Sunita Nirban, Smriti Ojha, Tarun Kumar, Neha Jain, Najwa Mohamad, Pradeep Kumar, Manisha Pandey
    AAPS PharmSciTech.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multi-Drug Resistance Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Challenges in India: A Review
    Deepak Vishwakarma, Abhay Gaidhane, Sweta Sahu, Ashwini S Rathod
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis and its Implication with COVID-19
    Jasmine Arya, Sweety Dahiya, Anil Kumar Chhillar
    Coronaviruses.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis drug discovery: Progression and future interventions in the wake of emerging resistance
    Summaya Perveen, Diksha Kumari, Kuljit Singh, Rashmi Sharma
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.2022; 229: 114066.     CrossRef
  • Abdominal Tuberculosis Mimicking Ovarian Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
    Ikhwan Rinaldi, Abdul Muthalib, Djaja Gosal, Teguh Wijayadi, Barlian Sutedja, Tjondro Setiawan, Andika Gunawan, Nelly Susanto, Lingga Magdalena, Diah Rini Handjari, Fetisari Kurniawan, Aisyah Rifani, Kevin Winston
    International Medical Case Reports Journal.2022; Volume 15: 169.     CrossRef
  • Pediatric Tuberculosis Management: A Global Challenge or Breakthrough?
    Lehlogonolo N. F. Maphalle, Bozena B. Michniak-Kohn, Modupe O. Ogunrombi, Oluwatoyin A. Adeleke
    Children.2022; 9(8): 1120.     CrossRef
  • Various approaches to improving adherence of patients with tuberculosis. Prospects for the use of additive technologies in TB practice
    A. G. Naumov, A. S. Shprykov
    PULMONOLOGIYA.2022; 34(1): 80.     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anti-Tubercular Leads: A Concise Review
    Gabriel S. Oliveira, Raquel P. Costa, Paula Gomes, Maria Salomé Gomes, Tânia Silva, Cátia Teixeira
    Pharmaceuticals.2021; 14(4): 323.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of Human Babesiosis: Then and Now
    Isaline Renard, Choukri Ben Mamoun
    Pathogens.2021; 10(9): 1120.     CrossRef
  • Novel mutations detected from drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from North East of Thailand
    Ei Phoo Thwe, Wises Namwat, Porntip Pinlaor, Kulrattana Rueangsak, Arunnee Sangka
    World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • On the Mechanism of Development of Autoimmune Diseases Following Exposure to Inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    SV Skupnevskiy, GM Trukhina, EG Pukhaeva, AK Badtiev, FK Rurua, FE Batagova, ZhG Farnieva
    ЗДОРОВЬЕ НАСЕЛЕНИЯ И СРЕДА ОБИТАНИЯ - ЗНиСО / PUBLIC HEALTH AND LIFE ENVIRONMENT.2021; : 76.     CrossRef
  • Oral regimen for multi-drug-resistant TB can promote patient-centred and community-based treatment
    Suman Saurabh, Pankaj Bhardwaj
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2021; 10(12): 4607.     CrossRef
  • Adverse effects induced by second-line antituberculosis drugs: an update based on last WHO treatment recommendations for drug-resistant tuberculosis
    Ionela-Alina Grosu-Creangă, Antigona Carmen Trofor, Radu Adrian Crișan-Dabija, Daniela Robu-Popa, Cristina Mihaela Ghiciuc, Elena Cătălina Lupușoru
    Pneumologia.2021; 70(3): 117.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
    Jin Hong Chung
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(4): 251.     CrossRef
Novel respiratory infectious diseases in Korea
Hyun Jung Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):286-295.   Published online September 23, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00633
  • 6,938 View
  • 77 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Respiratory infections are very common and highly contagious. Respiratory infectious diseases affect not only the person infected but also the family members and the society. As medical sciences advance, several diseases have been conquered; however, the impact of novel infectious diseases on the society is enormous. As the clinical presentation of respiratory infections is similar regardless of the pathogen, the causative agent is not distinguishable by symptoms alone. Moreover, it is difficult to develop a cure because of the various viral mutations. Various respiratory infectious diseases ranging from influenza, which threaten the health of mankind globally, to the coronavirus disease 2019, which resulted in a pandemic, exist. Contrary to human expectations that development in health care and improvement in hygiene will conquer infectious diseases, humankind’s health and social systems are threatened by novel infectious diseases. Owing to the development of transport and trading activity, the rate of spread of new infectious diseases is increasing. As respiratory infections can threaten the members of the global community at any time, investigations on preventing the transmission of these diseases as well as development of effective antivirals and vaccines are of utmost importance and require a worldwide effort.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Barriers to and facilitators of populational adherence to prevention and control measures of COVID-19 and other respiratory infectious diseases: a qualitative evidence synthesis
    Tácito Zaildo, Thayla Amorim Santino, Gabriela Chaves, Baldomero Antonio Kato da Silva, João Carlos Alchieri, Cecilia M. Patino, Sarah Leite, Kleber Giovanni Luz, Ricardo Oliveira Guerra, Tito Hugo Soares da Penha, Gabriel Rodrigues da Silva, Ada Cristina
    European Respiratory Review.2023; 32(168): 220238.     CrossRef
  • Diarylpentanoids, the privileged scaffolds in antimalarial and anti‐infectives drug discovery: A review
    Amirah H. Ramli, Siti M. Mohd Faudzi
    Archiv der Pharmazie.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Infectious Respiratory Diseases Decreased during the COVID-19 Pandemic in South Korea
    Da Hae Kim, Thi Mai Nguyen, Jin Hee Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(11): 6008.     CrossRef
  • Advances in the science and treatment of respiratory diseases
    Jin Hong Chung
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2020; 37(4): 251.     CrossRef
Review article
Frailty and elderly in urology: implications for postoperative complications
Phil Hyun Song
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):296-301.   Published online October 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00752
  • 5,188 View
  • 60 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The geriatric population is at a greater risk of postoperative complications than young adults. This risk is associated with the physiologic decline seen in this population known as frailty. Unlike fitter patients, frail patients who undergo operative treatment have a greater likelihood of developing postoperative complications and endure prolonged hospital stays. This circumstance is comparable to the urological status. Therefore, tolerable measurement of frailty as a domain of preoperative health status has been suggested to ascertain vulnerability in elderly patients. In this review, we will elaborate on the concept of frailty and examine its importance with respect to surgical complications, focusing on the urological status.
Original articles
Usefulness of intraoperative determination of central lymph node metastasis by palpation in papillary thyroid cancer
Wan Wook Kim, Jeeyeon Lee, Jin Hyang Jung, Ho Yong Park, Won Hwa Kim, Hye Jung Kim, Ji-Young Park, Ralph P. Tufano
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):302-307.   Published online April 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00122
  • 5,566 View
  • 73 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study evaluated the usefulness of judgment of central lymph node (LN) metastasis by surgeon’s palpation in papillary thyroid cancer.
Methods
This study included 127 patients who underwent thyroidectomy and central compartment node dissection between October 2014 and February 2015. The criterion for suspicious LNs was hardness.
Results
Of the 20.5% (28/127) of suspicious for metastatic LNs according to surgeon determination, 92.8% (26/28) were confirmed to be metastatic in the final pathological examinations. Metastatic LNs were found in 38 (38.3%) of 99 patients without suspicious LNs, 29 of whom (76.3%) had micrometastases. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the determination of LN metastasis by a surgeon were 40.6%, 96.8%, 92.9%, and 61.6%, respectively.
Conclusion
Determination of central LN metastasis by a surgeon’s palpation may be useful to evaluate LNs owing to the high specificity and positive predictive values, especially in macrometastasis or high-risk LN disease.
Clinical outcomes of hysterectomy for benign diseases in the female genital tract: 6 years’ experience in a single institute
Hyo-Shin Kim, Yu-Jin Koo, Dae-Hyung Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):308-313.   Published online April 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00185
  • 5,893 View
  • 180 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Hysterectomy is one of the major gynecologic surgeries. Historically, several surgical procedures have been used for hysterectomy. The present study aims to evaluate the surgical trends and clinical outcomes of hysterectomy performed for benign diseases at the Yeungnam University Hospital.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent a hysterectomy for benign diseases from 2013 to 2018. Data included the patients’ demographic characteristics, surgical indications, hysterectomy procedures, postoperative pathologies, and perioperative outcomes.
Results
A total of 809 patients were included. The three major indications for hysterectomy were uterine leiomyoma, pelvic organ prolapse, and adenomyosis. The most common procedure was total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH, 45.2%), followed by open hysterectomy (32.6%). During the study period, the rate of open hysterectomy was nearly constant (29.4%–38.1%). The mean operative time was the shortest in the single-port laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH, 89.5 minutes), followed by vaginal hysterectomy (VH, 96.8 minutes) and TLH (105 minutes). The mean decrease in postoperative hemoglobin level was minimum in single-port LAVH (1.8 g/dL) and VH (1.8 g/dL). Conversion to open surgery or multi-port surgery occurred in five cases (0.6%). Surgical complications including wound dehiscence, organ injuries, and conditions requiring reoperation were observed in 52 cases (6.4%).
Conclusion
Minimally invasive approach was used for most hysterectomies for benign diseases, but the rate of open hysterectomy has mostly remained constant. Single-port LAVH and VH showed the most tolerable outcomes in terms of operative time and postoperative drop in hemoglobin level in selected cases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of Different Routes of Hysterectomy Based on a Prospective Algorithm and Their Complications in a Tertiary Care Institute
    Subrat Panda, Ananya Das, Rituparna Das, Nalini Sharma, Wansalan Shullai, Vinayak Jante, Anusuya Sharma, Kaushiki Singh, Prateeti Baruah, Ruksana Makakmayum, Imtiaz Wani
    Minimally Invasive Surgery.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
Risk factors affecting amputation in diabetic foot
Jun Ho Lee, Ji Sung Yoon, Hyoung Woo Lee, Kyu Chang Won, Jun Sung Moon, Seung Min Chung, Yin Young Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):314-320.   Published online May 6, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00129
  • 6,657 View
  • 207 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
A diabetic foot is the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (LEA). The study seeks to assess the risk factors of amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU).
Methods
The study was conducted on 351 patients with DFUs from January 2010 to December 2018. Their demographic characteristics, disease history, laboratory data, ankle-brachial index, Wagner classification, osteomyelitis, sarcopenia index, and ulcer sizes were considered as variables to predict outcome. A chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to test the relationship of the data gathered. Additionally, the subjects were divided into two groups based on their amputation surgery.
Results
Out of the 351 subjects, 170 required LEA. The mean age of the subjects was 61 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 15 years; there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of these averages. Osteomyelitis (hazard ratio [HR], 6.164; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.561−10.671), lesion on percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (HR, 2.494; 95% CI, 1.087−5.721), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.981−0.999), ulcer size (HR, 1.247; 95% CI, 1.107−1.405), and forefoot ulcer location (HR, 2.475; 95% CI, 0.224−0.73) were associated with risk of amputation.
Conclusion
Osteomyelitis, peripheral artery disease, chronic kidney disease, ulcer size, and forefoot ulcer location were risk factors for amputation in diabetic foot patients. Further investigation would contribute to the establishment of a diabetic foot risk stratification system for Koreans, allowing for optimal individualized treatment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Efficacy of Chinese and Western Medical Techniques in Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers With Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Lower Leg
    Yongchong Chen, Yunzhu Wang, TaiAn Zhang, Chao Meng, Qing Li, Bohui Zhang, Kai Zhang, Chunfang Qin
    The International Journal of Lower Extremity Wounds.2024; 23(1): 70.     CrossRef
  • Classification of foot ulcers in people with diabetes: A systematic review
    Matilde Monteiro‐Soares, Emma J. Hamilton, David A. Russell, Gulapar Srisawasdi, Edward J. Boyko, Joseph L. Mills, William Jeffcoate, Fran Game
    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Renal function is highly associated with podiatric risk in diabetic patients
    Jean-Baptiste Bonnet, Ilan Szwarc, Antoine Avignon, Sébastien Jugant, Ariane Sultan
    Clinical Kidney Journal.2023; 16(11): 2156.     CrossRef
  • Risk factor analysis for diabetic foot ulcer‐related amputation including Controlling Nutritional Status score and neutrophil‐to‐lymphocyte ratio
    Yandan Zhu, Hongtao Xu, Yuzhen Wang, Xia Feng, Xinyu Liang, Liying Xu, Zhiqiang Liang, Zhongjia Xu, Yawen Li, Yi Le, Manchen Zhao, Jianfei Yang, Ji Li, Yemin Cao
    International Wound Journal.2023; 20(10): 4050.     CrossRef
  • The association between estimated glomerular filtration rate and prognosis in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis
    Jinghang Zhang, Dong Chen, Xuemei Li, Min Ding, Jun Xu, Meijun Wang, Bai Chang
    International Wound Journal.2022; 19(7): 1650.     CrossRef
  • Renal Function Status in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Having Diabetic Foot Infection and Role of Antibiotics
    Shabab Hussain, . Arrham, Syeda Javeriya Saeed, Ahmad Murtaza Anwar, Asif Khan, Saifullah Brohi
    Pakistan Journal of Health Sciences.2022; : 189.     CrossRef
  • Re-understanding and focusing on normoalbuminuric diabetic kidney disease
    Na An, Bi-tao Wu, Yu-wei Yang, Zheng-hong Huang, Jia-fu Feng
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of curcumin intake on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled trial
    Mehrdad Mokhtari, Reza Razzaghi, Mansooreh Momen‐Heravi
    Phytotherapy Research.2021; 35(4): 2099.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Sarcopenia and Its Association With Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Community-Dwelling Asian Population
    Seung Min Chung, Jun Sung Moon, Min Cheol Chang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical outcomes among patients with chronic kidney disease hospitalized with diabetic foot disorders: A nationwide retrospective study
    Michael Salim
    Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Perioperative outcomes of interrupted anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation undergoing non-cardiac surgery
Bo Eun Park, Myung Hwan Bae, Hyeon Jeong Kim, Yoon Jung Park, Hong Nyun Kim, Se Yong Jang, Jang Hoon Lee, Dong Heon Yang, Hun Sik Park, Yongkeun Cho, Shung Chull Chae
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):321-328.   Published online July 16, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00353
  • 5,634 View
  • 98 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to investigate the incidences of and risk factors for perioperative events following anticoagulant discontinuation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) undergoing non-cardiac surgery.
Methods
A total of 216 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac consultation for suspending perioperative anticoagulants were enrolled. A perioperative event was defined as a composite of thromboembolism and major bleeding.
Results
The mean anticoagulant discontinuation duration was 5.7 (±4.2) days and was significantly longer in the warfarin group (p<0.001). Four perioperative thromboembolic (1.85%; three strokes and one systemic embolization) and three major bleeding events (1.39%) were observed. The high CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores and a prolonged preoperative anticoagulant discontinuation duration (4.4±2.1 vs. 2.9±1.8 days; p=0.028) were associated with perioperative events, whereas the anticoagulant type (non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants or warfarin) was not. The best cut-off levels of the HAS-BLED and CHA2DS2-VASc scores were 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, and the preoperative anticoagulant discontinuation duration for predicting perioperative events was 2.5 days. Significant differences in the perioperative event rates were observed among the four risk groups categorized according to the sum of these values: risk 0, 0%; risk 1, 0%; risk 2, 5.9%; and risk 3, 50.0% (p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the HAS-BLED score was an independent predictor for perioperative events.
Conclusion
Thromboembolic events and major bleeding are not uncommon during perioperative anticoagulant discontinuation in patients with NVAF, and interrupted anticoagulation strategies are needed to minimize these.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Bleeding risk in female patients undergoing intravesical injection of onabotulinumtoxinA for overactive bladder: a Danish retrospective cohort study
    Meryam El Issaoui, Sophia Elissaoui, Marlene Elmelund, Niels Klarskov
    International Urogynecology Journal.2023; 34(10): 2581.     CrossRef
Case reports
Negative myoclonus associated with tramadol use
Seong Yoon Bae, Se-Jin Lee
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):329-331.   Published online April 23, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00108
  • 6,845 View
  • 179 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Negative myoclonus (NM) is a shock-like jerky involuntary movement caused by a sudden, brief interruption of tonic muscle contraction. NM is observed in patients diagnosed with epilepsy, metabolic encephalopathy, and drug toxicity and in patients with brain lesions. A 55-year-old man presented with NM in both his arms and neck. He has taken medications containing tramadol at a dose of 80–140 mg/day for 5 days due to common cold. He had no history of seizures. Acute lesions were not observed during magnetic resonance imaging, and abnormal findings in his laboratory tests were not noted. His NM resolved completely after the discontinuation of tramadol and the oral administration of clonazepam. Our case report suggests that tramadol can cause NM in patients without seizure history or metabolic disorders, even within its therapeutic dose.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Tramadol Induced Jerks
    Waiz Wasey, Imad Aziz, Sharefi Saleh, Naila Manahil, Neha Wasey
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Prevention of thiopurine-induced early leukopenia in a Korean pediatric patient with Crohn’s disease who turned out to possess homozygous mutations in NUDT15 R139C
Jaewoan Bae, Byung-Ho Choe, Ben Kang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):332-336.   Published online May 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00178
  • 5,331 View
  • 86 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Homozygous mutations in NUDT15 R139C are known as the major factor associated with thiopurine-induced early leukopenia, particularly in Asian patients. Therefore, NUDT15 genotyping is currently recommended before thiopurine treatment to identify patients who are NUDT15 poor metabolizers and consider the use of an alternative immunomodulatory therapy. We report a case of a 12-year-old Korean girl with Crohn’s disease (CD), in whom thiopurine-induced leukopenia was prevented by initiation of azathioprine (AZA) therapy at a low dose (0.5 mg/kg/day) and early detection of significant hair loss and white blood cell (WBC) count decrease at 17 days from the start of AZA treatment. The WBC count dropped from 8,970/μL to 3,370/μL in 2 weeks, and AZA treatment was stopped because of concerns of potential leukopenia in the near future. Her WBC count recovered to 5,120/μL after 3 weeks. Gene analysis later revealed that she had a homozygous mutation in NUDT15 R139C, resulting in a poor metabolizing activity of NUDT15. In situations when NUDT15 genotyping is unavailable, initiation of AZA therapy at 0.5 mg/kg/day with close observation of hair loss and WBC counts within 2 weeks may be an alternative way to prevent thiopurine-induced early leukopenia in Asian children with CD.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Identification of Candidate Genes for Min Pig Villi Hair Traits by Genome-Wide Association of Copy Number Variation
    Xinmiao He, Ming Tian, Wentao Wang, Yanzhong Feng, Zhongqiu Li, Jiahui Wang, Yan Song, Jinfeng Zhang, Di Liu
    Veterinary Sciences.2023; 10(5): 307.     CrossRef
  • Case report: NUDT15 polymorphism and severe azathioprine-induced myelosuppression in a young Chinese female with systematic lupus erythematosus: a case analysis and literature review
    Juan Gu, Yupei Lin, Yuhe Wang
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • KASL clinical practice guidelines for management of autoimmune hepatitis 2022

    Clinical and Molecular Hepatology.2023; 29(3): 542.     CrossRef
Ureterosciatic hernia causing obstructive uropathy successfully managed with minimally invasive procedures
Yeong Uk Kim, Jae Ho Cho, Phil Hyun Song
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):337-340.   Published online July 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00402
  • 4,596 View
  • 98 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Ureterosciatic hernia is extremely rare. In ureteral herniation, ureter prolapses occur through either the greater or lesser sciatic foramen. Atrophy of the piriformis muscle, hip joint diseases, and defects in the parietal pelvic fascia are predisposing factors for the development of ureterosciatic hernia. Most symptomatic patients have been treated surgically, with conservative treatment reserved only for asymptomatic patients. To the best of our knowledge, long-term follow-up outcomes after ureterosciatic hernia management are sparse. In this paper, we report the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with colicky left abdominal pain. After computed tomography (CT) scan and anterograde pyelography, she was diagnosed ureterosciatic hernia with obstructive uropathy. We performed ureteral balloon dilatation and double-J ureteral stent placement. After this minimally invasive procedure, CT scan demonstrated that the left ureter had returned to its normal anatomical position without looping into the sciatic foramen. The patient remained asymptomatic with no adverse events 7 years after the minimally invasive procedures. This brief report describes ureterosciatic hernia successfully managed with minimally invasive procedures with long-term follow-up outcomes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ureterosciatic Hernia in Focus: A Narrative Review of the Literature
    Mohamed Mustafa, Afiq Pouzi, Peter Senada, Lokesh Suraparaju, Suresh Gupta
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Urosepsis secondary to ureterosciatic hernia corrected with ureteral stent placement: a case report and literature review
    Kohei Kakimoto, Mayu Hikone, Ko Nagai, Jun Yamakawa, Kazuhiro Sugiyama, Yuichi Hamabe
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Clinical characteristics of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy presenting with monoparesis in the emergency department
Changho Kim, Jin-Sung Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(4):341-344.   Published online July 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00472
  • 5,366 View
  • 68 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is a rare neurological genetic disease caused by deletion of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene and presents in childhood or young adulthood. We report four cases of HNPP with typical and rare presentations, reflecting the broad clinical spectrum of this disease. Two patients presented with mononeuropathies that are frequently observed in HNPP; the remaining two presented with bilateral neuropathy or mononeuropathy anatomically present in the deep layer. This reflects the broad clinical presentation of HNPP, and clinicians should differentiate these conditions in young patients with monoparesis or bilateral paresis. Although HNPP is currently untreatable, early diagnosis in the emergency department can lead to early detection, eventually resulting in less provocation and recurrence which may cause early motor nerve degeneration.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science