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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Sung Mee Jung 2 Articles
Drug selection for sedation and general anesthesia in children undergoing ambulatory magnetic resonance imaging
Sung Mee Jung
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(3):159-168.   Published online April 17, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00171
  • 11,528 View
  • 372 Download
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The demand for drug-induced sedation for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have substantially increased in response to increases in MRI utilization and growing interest in anxiety in children. Understanding the pharmacologic options for deep sedation and general anesthesia in an MRI environment is essential to achieve immobility for the successful completion of the procedure and ensure rapid and safe discharge of children undergoing ambulatory MRI. For painless diagnostic MRI, a single sedative/anesthetic agent without analgesia is safer than a combination of multiple sedatives. The traditional drugs, such as chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, midazolam, and ketamine, are still used due to the ease of administration despite low sedation success rate, prolonged recovery, and significant adverse events. Currently, dexmedetomidine, with respiratory drive preservation, and propofol, with high effectiveness and rapid recovery, are preferred for children undergoing ambulatory MRI. General anesthesia using propofol or sevoflurane can also provide predictable rapid time to readiness and scan times in infant or children with comorbidities. The selection of appropriate drugs as well as sufficient monitoring equipment are vital for effective and safe sedation and anesthesia for ambulatory pediatric MRI.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prioritisation of data-poor pharmaceuticals for empirical testing and environmental risk assessment
    Cristiana Cannata, Thomas Backhaus, Irene Bramke, Maria Caraman, Anna Lombardo, Rhys Whomsley, Caroline T.A. Moermond, Ad M.J. Ragas
    Environment International.2024; 183: 108379.     CrossRef
  • Review of pediatric sedation and anesthesia for radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures
    Mohammed Ageel
    Journal of Radiation Research and Applied Sciences.2024; 17(1): 100833.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of airway collapsibility following single induction dose ketamine with propofol versus propofol sedation in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging: A randomised controlled study
    Pooja Bhardwaj, Sakthirajan Panneerselvam, Priya Rudingwa, Kirthiha Govindaraj, M.V.S. Satya Prakash, Ashok S. Badhe, Krishnan Nagarajan
    Indian Journal of Anaesthesia.2024; 68(2): 189.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of oral triclofos and intranasal midazolam and dexmedetomidine for sedation in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): an open-label, three-arm, randomized trial
    Shyam Chandrasekar, Bhagirathi Dwibedi, Rashmi Ranjan Das, Biswa Mohan Padhy, Bikram Kishore Behera
    European Journal of Pediatrics.2023; 182(3): 1385.     CrossRef
  • Correlation between the actual sleep time 24 hours prior to an examination and the time to achieve chloral hydrate sedation in pediatric patients in South Korea: a prospective cohort study
    Mijung Park, Ji Um, So Hyun Kim, Jiseon Yoon, Yeonjae Lee, Jiyeong Kwon, Seonhee Baek, Dong Yeon Kim
    Child Health Nursing Research.2023; 29(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • COMPARISON OF INTRAMUSCULAR VERSUS INTRAVENOUS KETAMINE FOR SEDATION IN CHILDREN UNDERGOING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EXAMINATION
    Jasim M. Salman, Jasim N. Al-Asadi, Husham H. Abdul-Ra’aoof, Jawad H. Ahmed, Ali H Reshak
    Wiadomości Lekarskie.2023; 76(1): 198.     CrossRef
  • Does sevoflurane sedation in pediatric patients lead to “pseudo” leptomeningeal enhancement in the brain on 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging?
    Kiran Hilal, Kumail Khandwala, Saima Rashid, Faheemullah Khan, Shayan Sirat Maheen Anwar
    World Journal of Radiology.2023; 15(4): 127.     CrossRef
  • Intranasal dexmedetomidine versus intranasal midazolam as sole sedative agents for pelviabdominal magnetic resonance imaging in pediatrics: A randomized double-blind trial
    TaysserM Abdelraheem, HamdyA Hendawy, AmiraM Elkeblawy
    Bali Journal of Anesthesiology.2023; 7(2): 99.     CrossRef
  • Prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, phase 3 clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of intranasal dexmedetomidine to oral midazolam as premedication for propofol sedation in pediatric patients undergoing magnet
    Olivia Nzungu Wabelo, Denis Schmartz, Mario Giancursio, Françoise De Pooter, Giulia Caruso, Jean-François Fils, Philippe Van der Linden
    Trials.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of age on outpatient pediatric procedural sedation with intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral midazolam
    Xiaqing Zhou, Jialian Zhao, Haiya Tu, Kunwei Chen, Yaoqin Hu, Yue Jin
    European Journal of Pediatrics.2023; 183(1): 169.     CrossRef
  • Determination of the normal conus medullaris level in term infants: the role of MRI in early infancy
    Mengchun Sun, Benzhang Tao, Gan Gao, Hui Wang, Aijia Shang
    Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.2022; 29(1): 100.     CrossRef
  • Patient background related to success and adverse event in pediatric sedated MRI
    Yutaka Konda, Hajime Mihira, Louis Akiyama, Yuki Shiko, Yoshihito Ozawa, Yohei Kawasaki, Katsunori Fujii, Ryugo Hiramoto
    Pediatrics International.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Risk Factors for Chloral Hydrate Sedative Failure with Initial Dose in Pediatric Patients: a Retrospective Analysis
    Yu Cui, Langtao Guo, Qixia Mu, Lu Kang, Qin Chen, Qunying Wu, Yani He, Min Tang
    Pediatric Drugs.2022; 24(4): 403.     CrossRef
  • Using intranasal dexmedetomidine with buccal midazolam for magnetic resonance imaging sedation in children: A single-arm prospective interventional study
    Bi Lian Li, Hao Luo, Jun Xiang Huang, Huan Huan Zhang, Joanna R. Paquin, Vivian M. Yuen, Xing Rong Song
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Novel Propofol Dosing Regimen for Pediatric Sedation during Radiologic Tests
    Ji-Young Min, Jeong-Rim Lee, Hye-Mi Lee, Ho-Jae Nam, Hyo-Jin Byon
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(17): 5076.     CrossRef
  • Psychiatric outcomes following ketamine administration for orthopedic surgical anesthesia
    Alec E. Mansour, Elijah W. Hale, Daniel S. Saks
    Frontiers in Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Artificial intelligence in paediatric radiology: Future opportunities
    Natasha Davendralingam, Neil J Sebire, Owen J Arthurs, Susan C Shelmerdine
    The British Journal of Radiology.2021; 94(1117): 20200975.     CrossRef
Comparison of sevoflurane and propofol anesthesia on the incidence of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing lung surgery
Hyuckgoo Kim, Jisoo Han, Sung Mee Jung, Sang-Jin Park, Nyeong Keon Kwon
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2018;35(1):54-62.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2018.35.1.54
  • 6,384 View
  • 99 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The type and regimen of anesthesia may affect perioperative hyperglycemia following major surgical stress. This study compared the effects of sevoflurane and propofol on the incidence of hyperglycemia and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing lung surgery.
Methods
This retrospective study included 176 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had undergone lung surgery. Blood glucose levels and clinical outcomes from the preoperative period to the first 2 postoperative days (PODs) were retrospectively examined in patients who received sevoflurane (group S, n= 87) and propofol (group P, n=89) for maintenance of general anesthesia. The primary endpoint was the incidence of persistent hyperglycemia (2 consecutive blood glucose levels >180 mg/dL [10.0 mmol/L]) during the perioperative period. The secondary composite endpoint was the incidence of major postoperative complications and 30-day mortality rate after surgery.
Results
Blood glucose levels similarly increased from the preoperative period to the second POD in both groups (p=0.857). Although blood glucose levels at 2 hours after surgery were significantly lower in group P than in group S (p=0.022; 95% confidence interval for mean difference, -27.154 to -2.090), there was no difference in the incidence of persistent hyperglycemia during the perioperative period (group S, 70%; group P, 69%; p=0.816). The composite of major postoperative complications and all-cause in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates were also comparable between the two groups.
Conclusion
Sevoflurane and propofol were associated with a comparable incidence of perioperative hyperglycemia and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing lung surgery.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Strategies for intraoperative glucose management: a scoping review
    Nathaniel Morin, Sarah Taylor, Danae Krahn, Leyla Baghirzada, Michael Chong, Tyrone G. Harrison, Anne Cameron, Shannon M. Ruzycki
    Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie.2023; 70(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Impact of total intravenous anesthesia and total inhalation anesthesia as the anesthesia maintenance approaches on blood glucose level and postoperative complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial
    Xinghui Xiong, Yong He, Cheng Zhou, Qin Zheng, Chan Chen, Peng Liang
    BMC Anesthesiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current trends in management of hyperglycaemia in surgical patients with diabetes mellitus: a review
    Vladimir N. Kuklin, J. Matri, N. P. Barlow, S. H. Tveit, J. E. Kvernberg, E. -M. Ringvold, V. Dahl
    Annals of Critical Care.2022; (4): 33.     CrossRef
  • Effects of sevoflurane anesthesia and abdominal surgery on the systemic metabolome: a prospective observational study
    Yiyong Wei, Donghang Zhang, Jin Liu, Mengchan Ou, Peng Liang, Yunxia Zuo, Cheng Zhou
    BMC Anesthesiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science