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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Sang Wook Kang 2 Articles
The Difference of Left Atrial Volume Index: Can It Predict the Occurrence of Atrial Fibrillation after Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Flutter?.
Ung Kim, Young Jo Kim, Sang Wook Kang, In Wook Song, Jung Hwan Jo, Sang Hee Lee, Geu Ru Hong, Jong Seon Park, Dong Gu Shin
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2007;24(2):197-205.   Published online December 31, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2007.24.2.197
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BACKGROUND
The occurrence of atrial fibrillation after ablation of atrial flutter is clinically important. We investigated variables predicting this evolution in ablated patients without a previous atrial fibrillation history. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients (Male=28) who were diagnosed as atrial flutter without previous atrial fibrillation history were enrolled in this study. Group 1 (n=11) was defined as those who developed atrial fibrillation after atrial flutter ablation during 1 year follow-up. Group 2 (n=25) was defined as those who has not occurred atrial fibrillation during same follow-up term. Echocardiogram was performed to all patients. We measured left atrial size, left ventricle end diastolic and systolic dimension, ejection fraction and left atrial volume index before and after ablation of atrial flutter. The differences of each variables were compared and analyzed between two groups. RESULTS: The preablation left ventricular ejection fraction (preLVEF) and postablation left ventricular ejection fraction (postLVEF) are 54+/-14%, 56+/-13% in group 1 and 47+/-16%, 52+/-13% in group 2. The differences between each two groups are statistically insignificant (2.2+/-1.5 in group 1 vs 5.4+/-9.8 in group 2, p=0.53). The preablation left atrial size (preLA) and postablation left atrial size (postLA) are 40+/-4 mm, 41+/-4 mm in group1 and 44+/-8 mm, 41+/-4 mm in group 2. The atrial sizes of both groups were increased but, the differences of left atrial size between two groups before and after flutter ablation were statistically insignificant (0.6+/-0.9mm in group 1 vs -3.8+/-7.4 mm in group 2, p=0.149). The left atrial volume index before flutter ablation was significantly reduced in group 1 than group 2 (32+/-10 mm3/m2, 35+/-10 mm3/m2 in group 1 and 32+/-10 mm3/m2, 29+/-8 mm3/m2 in group 2, p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The difference between left atrial volume index before and after atrial flutter ablation is the robust predictor of occurrence of atrial fibrillation after atrial flutter ablation without previous atrial fibrillation.
A Case of Glycogen Storage Disease with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.
Dong Hee Kim, Sang Wook Kang, Won Jong Park, Kyoung Ae Jang, Joon Hyuk Choi, Woong Kim, Sang Hee LEE, Geu Ru Hong
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2006;23(2):252-257.   Published online December 31, 2006
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2006.23.2.252
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Glycogen storage diseases are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorder affecting multiple organ system: liver, skeletal muscle, heart and brain. Clinical features include: short status, hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, dyslipidemia and rare involvement of the myocardium except in the case of type III, glycogen storage diseases with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in adult, which is extremely rare. We treated a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with hepatomegaly that was unknown etiology. The patient was diagnosed as having glycogen storage disease. This 46-year old women was transferred with dyspnea on exertion and abnormal LFTs. She was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by echocardiography but there was no specific cause for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A liver biopsy was performed. The result showed glycogen storage disease possible type III, IV or IX. In conclusion, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology and abnormal LFTs should be evaluated for glycogen storage disease.

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science