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JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science

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Eun Young Park 5 Articles
Association between dental amalgam restoration and urine mercury concentrations among young women: a cross-sectional study
Su-Bin Park, Eun-Kyong Kim, Joon Sakong, Eun Young Park
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(4):373-380.   Published online March 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00955
  • 1,299 View
  • 60 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The association between dental amalgam fillings and urine mercury concentrations was investigated in this study to assess the health risks associated with dental amalgams.
Methods
This cross-sectional study included 99 women in their 20s who visited the dental clinic in Daegu, Korea. The 99 participants were composed of 68 subjects who had dental amalgam fillings (exposure group) and 31 subjects who did not have dental amalgam fillings (nonexposure group). Oral examinations were conducted by a single dental hygienist, sociodemographic features were investigated as confounding variables, and urine mercury concentrations were measured using an automatic mercury analyzer.
Results
The mean±standard deviation of the urine mercury concentrations of the exposure and nonexposure groups were 1.50±1.78 μg/g creatinine and 0.53±0.63 μg/g creatinine, respectively. The exposure group showed significantly higher levels than the nonexposure group (p<0.01). The urine mercury concentration significantly increased with an increase in the number of teeth filled with amalgam, cavity surfaces involved, and number of defective amalgam fillings, and according to the latest exposure time (p<0.001). In the multiple regression analysis of amalgam-related factors and urine mercury concentrations after correction for confounding factors, the urine mercury concentration in the group with six or more amalgam-filled teeth, 11 or more cavity surfaces, and two or more defective amalgams was significantly higher than that in the nonexposure group (p<0.001).
Conclusion
According to this study, exposure to dental amalgams was confirmed to significantly affect urine mercury concentrations.
Three-dimensional printing of temporary crowns with polylactic acid polymer using the fused deposition modeling technique: a case series
Eun-Kyong Kim, Eun Young Park, Sohee Kang
J Yeungnam Med Sci. 2023;40(3):302-307.   Published online November 4, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/jyms.2022.00612
  • 1,496 View
  • 85 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
With recent developments in digital dentistry, research on techniques and materials for three-dimensional (3D) printing is actively underway. We report the clinical applications and outcomes of 3D printing of temporary crowns fabricated with polylactic acid (PLA) using a fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer. Five participants were recruited from among patients scheduled to be treated with a single full-coverage crown at a dental clinic in a university medical center from June to August 2022. We used 3D-printed crowns fabricated with PLA using an FDM printer as temporary crowns and were assessed for discomfort, fracture, and dislodging. The 3D-printed temporary crowns were maintained without fracture, dislodging, or discomfort until the permanent prosthesis was ready. The average time required for printing the temporary crowns was approximately 7 minutes. The 3D printing of temporary crowns with PLA using an FDM printer is a convenient process for dentists. However, these crowns have some limitations, such as rough surface texture and translucency; therefore, the 3D printing process should be improved to produce better prostheses.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cytotoxicity of dental self-curing resin for a temporary crown: an in vitro study
    Jae-wan Ko, Joon Sakong, Sohee Kang
    Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science.2023; 40(Suppl): S1.     CrossRef
  • Wear resistance of dental resin crowns in accordance with different additive manufacturing technologies and abrader types during chewing simulations
    Myoung Ji Choi, Jae-Sung Kwon
    Korean Journal of Dental Materials.2023; 50(4): 217.     CrossRef
Evaluation of craniofacial morphology in short-statured children: growth hormone deficiency versus idiopathic short stature
Ki Bong Kim, Eun-Kyong Kim, Kyung Mi Jang, Min Seon Kim, Eun Young Park
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2021;38(1):47-52.   Published online July 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00325
  • 5,827 View
  • 89 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Short stature is defined as a height below the 3rd percentile or more than two standard deviations below the mean for a given age, sex, and population. There have been inconsistent results regarding craniofacial morphology in short-statured children. This study aimed to analyze the differences between short-statured children with growth hormone deficiency, idiopathic short-statured children, and normal children.
Methods
Thirty-one short-statured children with growth hormone deficiency, 32 idiopathic short-statured children, and 32 healthy children were enrolled in this study. The measurements of their craniofacial structures from lateral cephalograms were evaluated.
Results
There were statistically significant differences among the three groups seven variables (anterior cranial base length, posterior cranial base length, total cranial base length, upper posterior facial height, posterior total facial height, mandibular ramus length, and overall mandibular length) in the linear measurement and five variables (saddle angle, gonial angle, mandibular plane angle, position of mandible, and maxilla versus mandible) in the angular measurement.
Conclusion
Compared to the control group, many linear and angular measurements of the craniofacial structures were significantly different in the two short-statured groups (p<0.05). Treatment plans by orthodontists should include these craniofacial structure characteristics.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dental arches in inherited severe isolated growth hormone deficiency
    Rafaela S. Girão, Manuel H. Aguiar-Oliveira, Bruna M.R. Andrade, Marcos A.V. Bittencourt, Roberto Salvatori, Evânio V. Silva, André L.M. Santos, Matheus M. Cunha, Wilton M. Takeshita, Alaíde H.A. Oliveira, Eugênia H.O. Valença, Alécia A. Oliveira-Santos,
    Growth Hormone & IGF Research.2022; 62: 101444.     CrossRef
  • Sella turcica dimensions and maxillary growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate
    Gregory S. Antonarakis, Luis Huanca Ghislanzoni, David M. Fisher
    Journal of Stomatology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.2022; 123(6): e916.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Implications of Growth Hormone Deficiency for Oral Health in Children: A Systematic Review
    Natalia Torlińska-Walkowiak, Katarzyna Anna Majewska, Andrzej Kędzia, Justyna Opydo-Szymaczek
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(16): 3733.     CrossRef
  • A Clinical Study on the Treatment of Children’s Short Stature with Auxiliary Comprehensive Management Combined with Growth Patch
    Haiying Feng, Weizhu Zhao, Huijun Yu, Guanfu Wang, Qunhong Wang, Songwen Tan
    Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
Current aspects and prospects of glass ionomer cements for clinical dentistry
Eun Young Park, Sohee Kang
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2020;37(3):169-178.   Published online July 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2020.00374
  • 15,560 View
  • 710 Download
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Glass ionomer cement (GIC) is a tailor-made material that is used as a filling material in dentistry. GIC is cured by an acid-base reaction consisting of a glass filler and ionic polymers. When the glass filler and ionic polymers are mixed, ionic bonds of the material itself are formed. In addition, the extra polymer anion reacts with calcium in enamel or dentin to increase adhesion to the tooth tissue. GICs are widely used as adhesives for artificial crowns or orthodontic brackets, and are also used as tooth repair material, cavity liner, and filling materials. In this review, the current status of GIC research and development and its prospects for the future have been discussed in detail.

Citations

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  • Comparative Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Conventional Glass Ionomer Cement Incorporated with Nonfluoridated Remineralizing Agents
    Nagalakshmi Chowdhary, Shri Mahalakshmi, Veena Shivanna, M Hema, N Karthikeyan, CM Jayashankar
    International Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry.2024; 17(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • Comparative evaluation of microleakage of self-cure, dual-cure, and light cure glass ionomer cement in a simulated oral environment - an invitro study
    Sruthi Chandran, Chandru T P, Faizal C Peedikayil, Soni Kottayi, Athira Aravindan
    International Journal of Pedodontic Rehabilitation.2024; 9(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Effectiveness of Ion-Releasing Restorations versus Composite Restorations in Dental Restorations: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Heber Isac Arbildo-Vega, Fredy Hugo Cruzado-Oliva, Franz Tito Coronel-Zubiate, Sara Antonieta Luján-Valencia, Joan Manuel Meza-Málaga, Rubén Aguirre-Ipenza, Adriana Echevarria-Goche, Eduardo Luján-Urviola, Tania Belú Castillo-Cornock, Katherine Serquen-Ol
    Dentistry Journal.2024; 12(6): 158.     CrossRef
  • Anticariogenic and Mechanical Characteristics of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement Containing Lignin-Decorated Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles
    Zuleikha Malik, Nawshad Muhammad, Muhammad Kaleem, Maleeha Nayyar, Asma Saleem Qazi, Danial Qasim Butt, Sher Zaman Safi, Abdul Samad Khan
    ACS Applied Bio Materials.2023; 6(2): 425.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of compressive strength, surface microhardness, solubility and antimicrobial effect of glass ionomer dental cement reinforced with silver doped carbon nanotube fillers
    Tamer M. Hamdy
    BMC Oral Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Concept of a Novel Glass Ionomer Restorative Material with Improved Mechanical Properties
    Philipp Messer-Hannemann, Henrik Böttcher, Sven Henning, Falk Schwendicke, Susanne Effenberger
    Journal of Functional Biomaterials.2023; 14(11): 534.     CrossRef
  • Emerging Applications of Nanotechnology in Dentistry
    Shiza Malik, Yasir Waheed
    Dentistry Journal.2023; 11(11): 266.     CrossRef
  • Color stability of nano resin-modified glass Ionomer restorative cement after acidic and basic medications challenge
    Zainab R Hasan, Noor R Al-Hasani, Osamah Malallah
    Journal of Baghdad College of Dentistry.2023; 35(4): 10.     CrossRef
  • Do bioactive materials show greater retention rates in restoring permanent teeth than non-bioactive materials? A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Juliana Benace Fernandes, Sheila Mondragón Contreras, Manuela da Silva Spinola, Graziela Ribeiro Batista, Eduardo Bresciani, Taciana Marco Ferraz Caneppele
    Clinical Oral Investigations.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Marginal microleakage and modified microtensile bond strength of Activa Bioactive, in comparison with conventional restorative materials
    Saba Tohidkhah, Hamid Kermanshah, Elham Ahmadi, Behnous Jalalian, Ladan Ranjbar Omrani
    Clinical and Experimental Dental Research.2022; 8(1): 329.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of conventional glass ionomer cements in an environment of insufficient moisture exclusion
    Yukihiro Naganuma, Masatoshi Takahashi, Yukyo Takada, Kumi Hoshi, Aki Kitaoka, Atsushi Takahashi, Keiichi Sasaki
    Journal of Oral Science.2022; 64(3): 242.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of a Method to Determine Wear Resistance of Class I Tooth Restorations during Cyclic Loading
    Philipp Messer-Hannemann, Mariam Samadi, Henrik Böttcher, Sebastian Duy, Daniela Duy, Niclas Albrecht, Falk Schwendicke, Susanne Effenberger
    Materials.2022; 15(15): 5440.     CrossRef
  • Update on Dental Luting Materials
    Gary Kwun-Hong Leung, Amy Wai-Yee Wong, Chun-Hung Chu, Ollie Yiru Yu
    Dentistry Journal.2022; 10(11): 208.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Curing Mode on the Bond Strength of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements
    Yongxiang Xu, Yuan Li, Hong Lin, Bin Yu
    Advances in Materials Science and Engineering.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • The Attitude of the General Dentist in the Republic of Croatia toward Treating Children
    Lidia Gavić, Ivana Nikolić, Sharanbir K. Sidhu, Daniel Jerković, Antonija Tadin
    Children.2022; 9(12): 1888.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Protective Surface Coating on Fluoride Release and Recharge of Recent Uncoated High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer Cement
    Nantawan Krajangta, Chayanee Dulsamphan, Tongjai Chotitanmapong
    Dentistry Journal.2022; 10(12): 233.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Three Luting Materials Used in Band and Loop Space Maintainer Cementation: An In Vitro Study
    SaraMuhannad Zaidan, ReemAtta Rafeeq
    Dental Hypotheses.2022; 13(4): 136.     CrossRef
  • Applications of Antioxidants in Dental Procedures
    Fan Qi, Haofei Huang, Ming Wang, Weifeng Rong, Jing Wang
    Antioxidants.2022; 11(12): 2492.     CrossRef
  • Conventional glass-ionomer cements: a guide for practitioners
    Petros Mylonas, Jing Zhang, Avijit Banerjee
    Dental Update.2021; 48(8): 643.     CrossRef
  • Difference in Bonding Strength of RMGIC according to Type of Hemostatic Agent in Primary Tooth
    Seolah Back, Joonhaeng Lee, Jongbin Kim, Miran Han, Jong Soo Kim
    THE JOURNAL OF THE KOREAN ACADEMY OF PEDTATRIC DENTISTRY.2021; 48(4): 460.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Aluminum Chloride Hemostatic Agent on Bonding Strength of RMGIC in Primary Tooth
    Seung-Hee Woo, Jisun Shin, Joonhaeng Lee, Miran Han, Jong Soo Kim
    THE JOURNAL OF THE KOREAN ACADEMY OF PEDTATRIC DENTISTRY.2021; 48(4): 397.     CrossRef
Comparison of the removal torque and a histomorphometric evaluation of the RBM treated implants with the RBM followed by laser treated implants: an experimental study in rabbits
Eun Young Park, Hae Ok Sohn, Eun-Kyong Kim
Yeungnam Univ J Med. 2019;36(1):43-49.   Published online January 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12701/yujm.2019.00094
  • 4,919 View
  • 92 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In the osseointegration of dental implants, the implant surface properties have been reported to be some of the most important critical factors. The effect of implant’s surfaces created by resorbable blast media (RBM) followed by laser ablation on bone tissue reactions was examined using the removal torque test and histomorphometric analysis.
Methods
Two types of dental implants, RBM-laser implants (experimental group) and RBM implants (control group) (CSM implant system, Daegu, Korea; L=6 mm, diameter=3.75 mm) were placed into the right and left distal femoral metaphysis of 17 adult rabbits. Six weeks after placement, removal torque was measured and histomorphometric analysis was performed.
Results
The mean removal torque was 24.0±10.2 Ncm and 46.6±16.4 Ncm for the control and test specimens, respectively. The experimental RBM-laser implants had significantly higher removal torque values than the control RBM implants (p=0.013). The mean values of total and cortical bone to implant contact (BIC) were respectively 46.3±10.8% and 65.3±12.5% for the experimental group, and 41.9±18.5% and 57.6±10.6% for the control group. The experimental RBM-laser implants showed a higher degree of total and cortical BIC compared with RBM implants, but there was no statistical significance (p=0.482, 0.225).
Conclusion
The removal torque and BIC of the test group were higher than those of the control group. In this study, the surface treatment created by RBM treatment followed by laser ablation appears to have a potential in improving bone tissue reactions of dental implants.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Determining primary stability for adhesively stabilized dental implants
    Ole Zoffmann Andersen, Benjamin Bellón, Maryam Lamkaouchi, Marzia Brunelli, Qiuju Wei, Philip Procter, Benjamin E. Pippenger
    Clinical Oral Investigations.2023; 27(7): 3741.     CrossRef

JYMS : Journal of Yeungnam Medical Science